Hurrican Shutters

Installing "Peace of Mind"

Posts Tagged ‘Rolling Shutters’

Low pressure system likely to become tropical depression or storm

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 30, 2014

Low pressure system likely to become tropical depression or storm1. Shower and thunderstorm activity remains minimal in association with
a low pressure area located about 140 miles east-northeast of
Melbourne, Florida. However, surface pressures are falling, and
environmental conditions are forecast to become more conducive for
development during the next few days. A tropical depression is
likely to form by mid-week while the system moves slowly
southwestward and thens turns northward and northeastward near the
southeastern United States coast. An Air Force Reserve
reconnaissance aircraft is scheduled to investigate the low this
afternoon, if necessary.

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Tracking the tropics

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 18, 2014

Tracking the tropicsQuick Summary:- Currently no tropical cyclones anywhere in the world

– Weak disturbance near Florida bringing showers and thunderstorms there; not currently showing signs of tropical development
– Eastern Pacific system could eventually develop, but not doing so yet

ATLANTIC, CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO

There’s an area of showers and thunderstorms with some twist evident on satellite/radar loops over the northwest Bahamas and parts of the Florida peninsula.
A couple earlier runs of the RPM model were eye-catching, showing the system spinning like a top and heading into Florida on Thursday.
Every once in a while one of these things at this time of year will quickly turn into a tropical depression or storm, and on general principle we keep an eye on systems in such close proximity to the U.S.; however there is currently no surface circulation (the rotation is ~2-4 miles up) and surface pressures in the area are higher than what is typically conducive to tropical cyclone formation, and for now that has to be considered a long shot.
We’ll monitor and let you know if that changes; regardless, cloud-to-ground lightning and locally heavy rain will be hazards from the thunderstorms, typical of summer in Florida.
Nothing else new to report in the Atlantic, Caribbean, or Gulf.

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Hurricane Preparation Guide

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 11, 2014

Hurricane Preparation GuideHurricane season is approaching fast. It begins on June 1st. Early preparation is important and necessary. Hurricanes are strong storms that cause life and property-threatening hazards such as flooding, storm surge, high winds and tornadoes. Preparation is the best protection against the dangers of a hurricane. Educate yourself about the types of hurricanes and prepare your home and your family before the hurricane season begins.

More than 35 million Americans live in regions most threatened by Atlantic hurricanes.

Hurricane Classification and Categories

Hurricanes are classified into five categories based on their wind speed, central pressure, and damage potential (see chart). Category Three and higher hurricanes are considered major hurricanes, though Categories One and Two are still extremely dangerous and warrant your full attention. All Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastal areas are subject to hurricanes or tropical storms. Parts of the Southwest United States and the Pacific Coast experience heavy rains and floods each year from hurricanes spawned off Mexico.

The Atlantic hurricane season lasts from June to November, with the peak season from mid-August to late October. Hurricanes can cause catastrophic damage to coastlines and several hundred miles inland. Winds can exceed 155 miles per hour. Hurricanes and tropical storms can also spawn tornadoes and microbursts, create storm surges along the coast, and cause extensive damage from heavy rainfall. Hurricanes are classified into five categories based on their wind speed, central pressure, and damage potential (see chart). Category Three and higher hurricanes are considered major hurricanes, though Categories One and Two are still extremely dangerous and warrant your full attention.

Hurricane Preparation from Red Cross:

Build a disaster supply kit or check the kit you prepared last year. Include a three-day supply of water and ready-to-eat non-perishable foods. Don’t forget a manual can opener, battery-powered radio, flashlight and extra batteries. Your kit should also have a first aid kit, prescription and non-prescription medications, and copies of important documents. Prepare a personal disaster and evacuation plan. Identify two meeting places—one near your home, and one outside your area in case you can’t return home. Make plans for your pets. Select an out-of-area emergency contact person. Be informed. Know what a hurricane WATCH means. If a hurricane WATCH is issued.
Listen to weather updates from your battery-powered or hand-cranked radio. Bring in outdoor objects such as lawn furniture, hanging plants, bicycles, toys and garden tools. Anchor objects that cannot be brought inside. Close all windows and doors. Cover windows with storm shutters or pre-cut plywood. If time permits, and you live in an identified surge zone, elevate furniture or move it to a higher floor to protect it from flooding. Fill your vehicle’s gas tank. Check your disaster supply kit to make sure items have not expired. 4. If a hurricane WARNING is issued:
Listen to the advice of local officials, and leave if they tell you to do so. Secure your home by unplugging appliances and turning off electricity and the main water valve. If you are not advised to evacuate, stay inside, away from windows, skylights and glass doors. Do NOT use open flames, such as candles and kerosene lamps, as a source of light. If power is lost, turn off appliances to reduce damage from a power surge when electricity is restored. Hurricane Protection with Hurricane ShuttersHurricane shutters protect from all types of storms. Cyclones in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, or South Pacific Ocean are called hurricanes. Tropical storms along the Northwest Pacific Ocean are referred to as typhoons.

Property owners along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean should strongly consider installing hurricane shutters. Category 5 hurricanes can result in structural damages in excess of 15 miles from the shore. Cat 5 hurricane shutters are recommended for all regions close to the shore.

Cats 5 Shutters has installed Hurricane Shutters, Storm Shutters, Roll-up and down shutters, Windows Shutters, Bahama Shutters, Accordion Shutters, Shutters for Windows and Hurricane Protection throughout multiple counties in South Florida.

Contact Cat 5 Shutters today to get professional advise and installation service.

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Hurricane Shutters- Whats right for you?

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 4, 2014

Hurricane Shutters- Whats right for you?

Here are some considerations as you review your choices in window protection:

Its a lot easier to pull on an accordion shutter across sliding glass doors or to push a button and watch motorized shutters roll down.

Here are some ideas to help you think of what is best for your home and yourself.

Can you install protection yourself? Screwing plywood panels in place is a heavy, awkward task that typically takes more than one person. Many plywood users who emerged from the 2004 season of back-to-back storms vowed never again use plywood.

Plywood is the covering of first or last resort for many homeowners, but it is heavy and hard to store and attached when a storm nears. If it gets soaked repeatedly ( as it will during hurricane season) the layers can peel apart causing the homeowner to replace plywood often. It is also a fire and termite risk. If you choose to use it the plywood panels should be measured, drilled and labeled in advance. A 4 x 8 foot sheet of 5/8″ plywood is about 16.99 these days at your local hardware stores.

If you already have window protection, are you ready to roll? Do you know where the Tapcons or wing nuts or other fasteners are? Do you know how to install or operate your protection?

Storage space can be a problem for plywood and for heavy stacks of Aluminum or Steel panels. Those metal panels can tear up your hands and cause serious injury if a stack of them drops or falls on you.

No matter what you need to protect your openings. CAT 5 SHUTTERS, LLC  can help. Contact us toll free at 1-877-cat-five or visit us on the web at www.cat5shutters.net for a free estimate.

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5 Key Points to Know About Hurricane Season

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 28, 2014

5 Key Points to Know About Hurricane Season1. SLOW SEASON EXPECTED

Federal forecasters are expecting a slower-than-usual Atlantic hurricane season, with eight to 13 tropical storms and three to six hurricanes. There’s no way to tell whether any of those potential storms will strike the U.S. coastline during the six-month season that starts June 1.

2. EL NINO

The weather phenomenon known as El Nino, which warms part of the Pacific every few years and changes rain and temperature patterns around the world, is expected to suppress the number and intensity of tropical storms and hurricanes this year. Cooler temperatures on the surface of the Atlantic Ocean compared with recent years will also lower the probability of hurricane formation.

3. WHEN DOES IT GET A NAME?

Forecasters name tropical storms when top winds reach 39 mph; hurricanes have maximum winds of at least 74 mph. The first storm name on the list this year is Arthur.

4. STORM SURGE

Storm surge — the dangerous water rise created by tropical storms — is one of the deadliest and most damaging tropical storm hazards. This year, the National Hurricane Center will post color-coded maps to show coastal residents how far from the shoreline the water will spread and how high that water will rise.

5. A LITTLE BIT OF HISTORY

It’s been 10 years since the historic 2004 hurricane season, when four hurricanes affected Florida for the first time since record-keeping began: Charley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne. There were 15 named storms that season, nine of which were hurricanes. But those four hurricanes remain among the costliest hurricanes to hit the U.S.

Whether you are in need of protecting a residence or business contact CAT 5 Shutters, LLC for a free estimate on hurricane protection.

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Are You Ready for Hurricane Shutter Installation

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 20, 2014

Are You Ready for Hurricane Shutter InstallationHurricane season is approaching fast-June 1. Setting up storm shades is extremely beneficial because they provide a physical barrier from flying debris battering the glass windows of your home. While windows are created from sturdy glass, even a small piece of wood or other debris can be picked up and flung through the air by a 100 mile per hour gust directly at your window. Such things can easily shatter even sturdy glass windows. Making use of a heavy-duty, well-designed hurricane shutter system overlaid on your windowpane is going to help soak up the brunt of the collision and reduce the damage.

Are you ready for hurricane shutter installation? Here is what you need to know.
A well-defined description of hurricane shutters is provided by Weberdesigngroup.

Hurricane shutters are available as: storm panel hurricane shutters, accordion hurricane shutters, colonial hurricane shutters, Bahama hurricane shutters, and roll – down hurricane shutters.

Storm Panel Hurricane Shutters

Storm panel hurricane shutters are the most popular hurricane shutters out of all of the shutters that are available. For homeowners that choose to install storm panel hurricane shutters, they will need to also install metal tracts that will hold the sheets of steel or corrugated aluminum in place along the window. The storm panel hurricane shutters are created in a corrugated style so that the pieces can overlap one another, creating an even stronger resistance to the hurricane-force winds. Since there are different storm pane hurricane shutters that are available for installation, it is up to the home owner on which style they would prefer.

One style of the storm panel shutters are inserted to the top tract, while the bottom of the panel is fastened to the bottom tract, which lies underneath the window. It is important to cover the entire window so that there are very little gaps, if any, that the hurricane’s winds can get into and blow the shutters off of the windows. There are two other versions of the storm panels as well: the panels that must be installed on tracts that are permanently set into the walls of the home, and the other are shutters that must be aligned with bolts, quite similar to hanging up a shower curtain. Many people like to purchase the storm panel hurricane shutters because they are the most inexpensive out of all of the shutters. They can also be disassembled once the hurricane has passed, which does not leave the shutters on the house permanently. They are also quite durable, which is what many homeowners are looking for. On the downside, storm panel shutters often have sharp and jagged edges, are cumbersome to maneuver, and some types are too heavy for only one individual to install. Although there may be more cons to pros, the storm panel hurricane shutters are the most popular out of all of the hurricane shutters available on the market.

Accordion Hurricane Shutters

Another form of hurricane shutters are accordion hurricane shutters. Just as the name would suggest, the accordion hurricane shutters open and shut just as an accordion would. They are stored on tracts that are permanently placed into a home, and fold like an accordion on either side of the windows for storage. Many home owners like the accordion hurricane style, as it can offer some of the maximum protection from a hurricane’s strong and gusty winds. Also, many home owners like to have the accordion style installed on their homes so that they do not have to worry about trying to apply hurricane shutters when there is a storm that is fast approaching. The cons of having accordion shutters are that the shutters can look aesthetically unappealing on a home, and it is set permanently. As much, accordion shutters run on wheels at the bottom of the tracts. Should any of the wheels break while in use, they can ruin the effectiveness of the shutters from an impending hurricane.

Colonial Hurricane Shutters

Colonial hurricane shutters are another form of shutter protection that can be placed on a house in the hopes of warding off severe damage to a home. These shutters are created in a horizontal, slat-like fashion, quite similar to the old colonial style of window shadings. There are two pieces that latch together in the middle of the window, thus covering the window as protection against the storm. Although colonial shutters are still in use, they are not as popular as the other shutters. They are fastened to the house permanently, which can be a huge time saver in the event of an emergency and fast preparedness is needed. Many single home owners like colonial hurricane shutters, because only one person is needed to operate and install them for use. They also come in various ornamental styles, which can appease the homeowners. However, older, and some newer, versions of the colonial hurricane shutters must be adhered together with a rod that is centrally placed on the window. This can make for a much longer time for readiness for the hurricane time that can be used for other preparations.

Bahama Hurricane Shutters

The Bahama hurricane shutters are almost exactly like the colonial hurricane shutters, except they come in one piece instead of two. They are installed as permanent fixtures on the home and come in various decorative styles. Some homeowners will not work with the Bahama hurricane shutters, as they feel that they are not effective enough as an alternate version of hurricane shutters. They are not designed to be as rugged and sturdy as the older models and their counterparts, which worries many homeowners.

Roll-Up and Down Hurricane Shutters

Roll-down hurricane shutters are perhaps the best liked of the shutter systems, although it is also the most expensive. Roll-down hurricane shutters can be engaged for window protection at the push of a button. These shutter systems are installed at the top of the windows, and there is a permanent metal receptacle that houses the shutters. Once a centralized button is pushed, the roll-down shutters will drop from their homes and cover the windows. This is the best feature of the shutters, as it is easy on those that live on their own, or who may have a difficult time installing shutters by themselves. On the other hand, the shutters can fail if there is not a battery to back up the controls, leading to unprotected windows.

Protecting one’s home is the most important goal when selecting hurricane shutters. It is important to know which ones work well with the homeowner’s budget, as well as, if they want to invest in long-term shutters. Above all, selecting shutters that will be for the betterment of one’s safety is the best purchase to make.

For professional advise and hurricane shutter installation contact Cat 5 Shutters today. Visit our website at www.cat5shutters.net

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Are we lucky?

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 15, 2014

Are we lucky?Will this be the year the USA’s luck runs out?

With the Atlantic hurricane season starting June 1, the nation is enjoying two record streaks for a lack of hurricanes: It’s been nine years since the last hit from a “major” hurricane and also nine years since a hurricane of any sort hit Florida, traditionally the most hurricane-prone state in the nation.

Both streaks began on Oct. 24, 2005, when Category 3 Hurricane Wilma slammed into southwest Florida with 120-mph winds.

A “major” hurricane is a Category 3, 4, or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale of Hurricane Intensity; the minimum wind speed for a major hurricane is 111 mph.

“This is the longest period on record with no major hurricane landfalls since 1878, when reliable landfall records began,” says Colorado State University meteorologist and hurricane expert Phil Klotzbach.
Despite its fury, Hurricane/Superstorm Sandy, was a Category 1 hurricane, with maximum winds of 80 mph, when it made landfall in October 2012 in New Jersey. Sandy is a good example of how wind speed can be an inadequate measure of a hurricane’s ferocity.

Sandy killed dozens of people and did $65 billion damage in the USA. alone, the National Climatic Data Center reported.

Hurricane Ike battered the Texas coast in 2008, killing at least 112 people and doing $27 billion in damage, but it missed the “major” hurricane label by 1 mph when it slammed ashore with winds of 110 mph.
One explanation for the hiatus in major hurricanes: “Luck, and it will run out,” says Dennis Feltgen, a spokesman with the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

Quiet hurricane season predicted

“Luck has certainly played a role,” agrees Klotzbach. Also, steering currents have helped guide storms out to sea, he says.
“We have tended to have a trough of low pressure along the East Coast of the U.S. during the past eight years, which has helped steer storms away from the mainland,” said Klotzbach.
Florida’s nine-year hurricane-free streak is also notable for the state that sticks out into the hurricane zone like a sore thumb: Since 1851, 114 hurricanes have hit Florida, according to data from the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. This is 39% of the total number of U.S. hurricane strikes.
“These remarkable streaks must end sometime.” noted Roger Pielke, Jr., a professor of environmental studies at the University of Colorado,
“We need to be prepared that this would be the year that both streaks end,” added Feltgen.

Hurricane season begins June 1. Klotzbach and his team at Colorado State, which includes William Gray, the dean of hurricane forecasting, are predicting a below-average season, with only three hurricanes forecast to form in the Atlantic.
AccuWeather’s forecast, released today, also predicts a below-average season, with five hurricanes.
A season with few hurricanes doesn’t mean that the ones that do form will be weak: In 1992, only four hurricanes formed, but one of them was monstrous Hurricane Andrew, which killed dozens and caused $27 billion in damages as it battered south Florida.
Federal forecasters from the Climate Prediction Center will issue their forecast on May 22.

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Know The Quality of Your Hurricane Window Shutters

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 13, 2014

Know The Quality of Your Hurricane Window ShuttersAt first glance, low quality window shutters may look like high quality shutters, but they rarely perform the same. Fortunately, you can tell the difference between the two by taking a closer look at construction, design, and thickness.

Construction

High quality shutters use specific hardware and building techniques that increase durability and life. For starters, high quality window shutters use butt hinges. Butt hinges attach the shutter to the house and are the most durable type of hinge. Next, high quality window shutters use a joining method called rabbeting, which works better than glue or other joining materials.

Low quality window shutters are use opposite methods of attaching and joining. Non-mortise hinges are commonly used rather than butt hinges because they’re cheaper and easier to install. They fasten the shutter to the house and are easy to remove, so the hold is weaker. And instead of rabbeting, low quality shutters use glue or other weaker materials to join pieces together. This means the lower quality shutter is more likely to break and peel.
Low quality windows shutters use thin panels, called louvers, instead of thicker ones. The result is a flimsy, low quality look that just doesn’t hold up over time.

Another difference between low quality and high quality shutters is the techniques used to paint them. Low quality window shutters use one coat of paint and high quality shutters use two or more coats for a strong finish. One coat of paint will fade and peel faster than multiple coats.

Design

Low quality shutters have four louvers or less. High quality ones have five or more. The limited number of louvers means low quality shutters are cut-to-fit. Cut-to-fit designs are inexpensive to make because they’re made to predetermined sizes with fewer louvers. The design also results in a lower quality look.
High quality shutters aren’t cut-to-fit. They’re made to fit the dimensions of a specific window. They’re carefully constructed to be in proportion with the shutter rails and louver area, resulting in a balanced shutter that allows more light and air to enter.

Thickness Stiles are the vertical pieces on the sides of each panel. Stile thickness on a high quality shutter is anywhere from 1 to 1 1/16 inches thick. The stiles on a low quality shutter are around 15/16 inches thick. Thick material creates a more stable the shutter. It is also sag-proof and less likely to warp over time.

When it comes to securing the safety of your family, home and business during severe weather, only the finest storm protection will do. If you live in Florida and need a quote call Cat 5 Shutters LLC. Call us toll free at 1-877-CAT-FIVE.

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Hurricane Protection Products

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 12, 2014

Hurricane Protection ProductsIf your house is in danger of being hit by a hurricane, protecting windows and sliding glass doors is almost always the number one thing you can do to ensure you’ll have a livable house if the worst happens. But, if you wait until a hurricane watch is posted, you are almost surely too late. The best time to prepare for the hurricane season is now. There are many readily available products that can reduce or minimize the impact and save homeowners big bucks in repairs and insurance premiums. The peace of mind that can result is priceless.

Secure Door For Your Home Garage Door

Secure Door® is an extremely effective, Florida Building Code approved (FL6420), highly affordable solution that provides wind protection for garage doors in the event of a major hurricane. The product is a vertical bracing system made from high quality aircraft-grade aluminum that attaches to the inside of the garage door. Secure Door® hurricane garage door protection strengthens the door and provides support for the door in addition to the garage door tracks. Secure Door® is a patented hurricane garage door brace that converts most existing garage doors to a hurricane-resistant garage door. While no garage door can be considered a hurricane proof garage door, Secure Door’s exceptional performance capabilities have been proven through independent laboratory tests and may be as close to that goal as possible.      
        

Garage Door Hurricane Facts

Did you know????

The garage door is potentially the largest and weakest opening of your home to a hurricane? According to the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes about 80 percent of residential hurricane wind damage starts with wind entry through garage doors? The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has identified the loss of the garage door as one of four major factors in homes damaged and destroyed in Hurricane Andrew? As the American Red Cross warns, if your garage door fails, the full fury of the hurricane will enter your house and in all probability blow off your roof and destroy your home?

Hurricane Shutters

When it comes to securing the safety of your family, home and business during severe weather, only the finest storm protection will do. Cat 5 Shutters LLC is South Florida’s leading producer of hurricane shutters based out of West Palm Beach, Florida.

Cat 5 Shutters LLC is especially proud to introduce the most advanced Hurricane Protection systems on the market today. We offer the finest and strongest hurricane shutters and storm protection on the market. All of our hurricane shutters are tested and approved by Miami-Dade County and the Florida building code (High velocity Hurricane Zone) which will guarantee the purchaser the highest level of “Peace of Mind” during a hurricane disaster. We manufacture a wide variety of hurricane shutters; Accordion Hurricane Shutters, Bahamas Hurricane Shutters, Colonial Hurricane Shutters, Roll Down Hurricane Shutters, Storm Hurricane Panels, Stainless Steel Hurricane Screens, and Roll Down Screens. Keeping Floridians safe against hurricanes, storms, intruders and the suns rays based out of West Palm Beach, Florida.

We invite you to contact us today for more information, and discover the secret to enjoying unprecedented storm protection and “peace-of-mind” for many years to come!!
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Hurricane Shutters

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 7, 2014

Hurricane ShuttersWhat is the best kind of shutter?

The best are those that are affordable and that you can manage to install or operate. For a disabled or elderly person, this may require some sort of automated method for closing; suggesting something like accordion shutters. For the strong handyman, heavy plywood trimmed to fit within the windows with secure mounting brackets makes sense. Bahamas shutters are a favorite for some because they serve a useful purpose year-round and are quick and easy to install when needed.
Storm panels are a good compromise for many people. Steel panels offer the best protection, but are difficult to install because of their weight. Aluminum panels at a comparable price offer less protection, but are easier to install. If there is no source of heavy debris upwind, you might consider the lesser protection of aluminum shutters adequate. There are other types. The key in all of these is that the installation must be good, and done by a qualified and reliable workman, and they must suit the conditions under which they will be installed and expected to perform.
Which shutter choice is best for you depends on how much work you can do in fabricating and installing them. One word of caution: if electric power is used to open or close shutters, then a mechanical backup is mandatory, since electricity may very well be out either before or after a hurricane.

What about plastic films?

Plastic films are no substitute for shutters or plywood covers for windows and doors. However, demonstrations of their strength are quite impressive, and they are probably the next best thing to solid covers for windows and doors, especially where access to such glass areas is physically restricted. One problem is that they provide only a small measure of protection for the glass itself, and frequently the frame holding the glass in place can fail. This includes both windows and sliding glass doors.

How do I choose a company I can trust?

The same way one goes about choosing any company that performs services. Make sure they are licensed and above all, check their references. If the company provides the references, they will likely not give you names of unsatisfied customers; thus referrals from friends and relatives are preferable. Also, check with your local licensing authority, and contractor associations.

When is the best time to get shutters installed?

The best time to have shutters installed is when your house is built so that they can be part of the design. If you already have a home without shutters, then get them installed as soon as it is practical to do so. If they are permanently in place on your home, — such as Bahamas shutters, roll-down, accordion, etc. — then practice closing them once a year before hurricane season to make sure everything is in place and in working order.
If they are panels, then check at the beginning of each hurricane season to see that all hardware is available and check each opening to make sure no repairs are required. It is also a good idea to practice installing these panels for a couple of windows or doors prior to each season, to time how long it takes you to install them.
When a hurricane watch is issued, check all mechanisms and hardware again, and perhaps install some of your more difficult shutters. If you are in a potential evacuation zone, and it is going to take you more than 2 to 3 hours to install your shutters, you may want to start the work during the hurricane watch phase. If you are not in an evacuation zone, you should have time during the hurricane warning phase to install your shutters.

What if I can’t afford to get shutters?

The least expensive effective method of protecting windows is probably plywood. If plywood covers are properly installed, they are just as effective, or maybe more effective than commercial shutters. The key is proper thickness and installation. They should be cut, fit, and installed prior to the hurricane season, and then well-marked and stored with hardware for quick installation should a hurricane threaten your area. The time for installation is the same as for shutters mentioned above. You might consider doing a few windows at a time over a long period, or seeking financing to make them affordable. There will still be some people who, for one reason or another, just can’t afford to do either of these. For those, it is like not having insurance, recovering from the disaster will be slow, and they will have to depend on outside help. Putting tape on the windows is not considered worth the effort.

No matter what type of shutter you need contact CAT 5 Shutters, LLC on web at www.cat5shutters.net or call us 561-333-2285 or 305-852-2285

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