Hurrican Shutters

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Posts Tagged ‘hurricane storm protection’

Preparations for your Pet

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 20, 2014

Preparations for your Pet

* Have your pet micro chipped, so they can be identified if they go missing.

* Get your pets acclimated to a locking crate or carrier. Just leave it out and open so they can freely go in and out to get comfortable with it.

* Do not leave your pet behind and alone, they may find a way to get out and run away.

* Evacuations may last longer than a day so make sure to be prepared for a week or two if needed with their food and toys.

* Most public shelters do not allow pets. Make sure to find a pet friendly shelter and call ahead to be sure.

* Some hotels will slow pets for a storm, again always call ahead.

* Your vet or animal shelter may take in pets on a list prior to a storm coming, call and find out what steps you would need to do to get on that list.

* Be attentive to your pet even after a storm blows through. Streets and yards may be flooded and full of debris. Nails, wood, glass and other objects can injury your pet and yourself.

* It is easy for animal to become disorientated, and there will be lots of unusual smells and thing t o explore that may be hazardous to them. Down power lines, puddles and other things could harm them and your self, so pay attention when going for walks.

* Be aware of wild animals running loose looking for dry land or food, from raccoons to snakes to other creatures finding their way into your home.

No matter what the case may be, always be prepared. Your home your family and your pets.

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Floridians to get break on insurance bills

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 19, 2014

Floridians to get break on insurance billsTALLAHASSEE, Fla. —

Nearly 10 years after Hurricane Wilma lumbered through South Florida consumers across the state are finally going to stop paying the bill associated with that storm.

State officials on Tuesday agreed to end the 1.3 percent surcharge that is placed on most insurance policies, including homeowner and auto policies.

“This is good news for consumers,” said Jack Nicholson, chief operating officer for the fund that has been collecting the surcharge that some critics have labeled a “hurricane tax.”

The state was forced to place the emergency assessment on insurance bills after the backup fund used to help private insurers pay off claims ran out of money in the wake of Wilma. Wilma was the fourth storm of 2005 and the eighth storm that hit the state during a two-year period.

The Florida Hurricane Catastrophe Fund was forced to borrow a total of $2.61 billion to reimburse private insurers.
The assessment was initially expected to remain on insurance bills until July 2016. But the state was able to reach settlements with the last batch of insurers and has enough money left over to retire the bonds it issued.
The vote on Tuesday ensures that the assessment will no longer appear on policies renewed or issued on or after Jan. 1, 2015.

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Florida riding a lucky streak as hurricane season 2014 opens

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 12, 2014

Florida riding a lucky streak as hurricane season 2014 opensThe last time a hurricane struck Florida, we were in the midst of a Shaq attack, largely oblivious to a phenom in Cleveland named LeBron becoming the youngest player to score more than 50 points in a pro basketball game. Jeb Bush was governor. And about 27,000 Miami-Dade first-graders hadn’t even been born. That may seem like ages ago in South Florida years. But in hurricane time, it’s just a lucky streak that forecasters warn could end anytime over the next six-month hurricane season, which officially opened Sunday.
“We’re very vulnerable, so it’s a matter of when, not if,” said National Hurricane Center Director Rick Knabb.
Florida, hit more times than any other state, has not had a hurricane in eight straight seasons — a desperately needed break after the worst two back-to-back years on record. But since then, there have been plenty of near misses fired from the Atlantic Basin, which experts say remains in a cycle of high activity.
In 2004, four hurricanes made landfall — Charley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne — the most recorded for the state in a single year. And 2005 was no cake walk: Three hurricanes crossed Florida that year including Katrina, on its fatal course to New Orleans, and Wilma, which slogged across the Everglades to leave a record-breaking 98 percent of South Florida in the dark and cause $20.6 billion in damage.
But since 2005, every hurricane has veered away from the peninsula — either skirting the coast like Superstorm Sandy or simply fizzling. But the state has not escaped unscathed. Enough tropical storms made landfall to ring up millions in damages.
In 2008, Tropical Storm Fay zigzagged its way to a record four landfalls in the state, causing five deaths and inflicting $560 million in damage. In 2012, Hurricane Isaac never made landfall in Florida, but its soggy tail whacked Palm Beach County, unleashing massive flooding that stranded some western residents for up to two days. Price: $71 million. That same year, Tropical Storm Debby dropped nearly 30 inches of rain on North Florida and the Panhandle, sending the Sopchoppy River over its banks and costing $250 million.
Meanwhile, the Gulf and the Caribbean got hammered.
In 2007, Noel killed 163 people in Hispaniola but then took a turn after it crossed Cuba and missed Florida. Three storms marched across the Gulf the next year: First, Dolly slammed Texas with 16 inches of rain, followed by Gustav in Louisiana and finally Ike, a massive storm that hit the entire coast from Louisiana west to Corpus Christi, Texas. Altogether, they generated more than $34 billion in damage.
In 2009, a small late-season hurricane named Ida made a beeline for Nicaragua from the Southwest Caribbean, leaving about 40,000 homeless before making landfall in Alabama and heading up the southeast coast to become a nor’easter.
During each of the next three years, 19 named storms stumbled around the North Atlantic, ricocheting off the Greater Antilles in the Caribbean. In 2010, five hurricanes hit Mexico, killing dozens and costing $7 billion.
And then there’s Sandy, the hurricane that skipped past Florida to devastate a swath of the Northeast after becoming a superstorm when it collided with a winter storm late in 2012.
Officially, this year is expected to be relatively quiet.
Forecasters say the El Niño weather pattern in the Pacific should keep the number of named storms to between eight and 13. They predict that three to six may become hurricanes and that two could grow into major storms. But, as forecasters emphasize every year, it only takes one big storm to make a bad year. And they have no bigger reminder than Sandy, which spun out of a frenzied year in which 10 hurricanes formed but only one made headlines.
“Sandy reminded us that loss of life and property during a tropical storm doesn’t necessarily come about from wind and rain. It comes from storm surge,” said National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Director Kathryn Sullivan.
Sandy proved to be a moment of reckoning for coastal states. Katrina may have shed light on the dangers of flooding, but the bowl-shaped topography of New Orleans made it seem uniquely vulnerable. In the wake of Sandy’s 72 deaths in the U.S. and $50 billion in damage, the country undertook a serious reassessment. Efforts were made to streamline emergency response and relief. And Congress agreed to spend $476 million on improved forecasting tools, including storm surge maps the hurricane center will roll out this year from its storm-proof bunker on Florida International University’s campus.
The maps, in real-time and interactive, will go up on the center’s website (www.nhc.noaa.gov) about an hour after it issues warnings and watches. That’s about 48 hours before winds are expected to make landfall, said Jamie Rhome, who heads the center’s storm surge unit. The information will be updated every six hours and show where water may go and how high it might rise. Designers worked hard to make them user-friendly, said Rhome, who compared their operation with Google maps.
“It will have a local feel, but you won’t be able to zoom in and out of a specific home,” he said.
The information has been available in text form for years, he said. But until recently, forecasters didn’t have the computer power needed to model so much information. The maps have to accommodate not only the contours of the coastline — both above ground and under water — but the intensity of a storm, where it lands, how fast it is moving, the angle it approaches and the timing of tides.
Max Mayfield, a former director of the hurricane center and hurricane specialist with WPLG-ABC 10, said the maps, which he began asking for when he was director between 2000 and 2007, are long overdue.
“Most people evacuate because of the wind, but by far the vast majority of people — in fact, 88 percent — die from water,” he said.
When Sandy made landfall in October 2012 on the south shore of New Jersey, its tropical storm-force winds extended about 1,000 miles. Water rose along the entire East Coast, from Florida to Maine, NOAA later reported. Tide gauges at the Battery in Manhattan and on Staten Island recorded water levels about nine feet above the lowest-lying spots on the shoreline. At Sandy Hook in New Jersey, a gauge measured eight feet before it failed.
NOAA repeatedly issued warnings about the surge. Gary Szatkowski, a meteorologist stationed at a weather station in Mount Holly, New Jersey, where 24 people died, even included his contact information to personally persuade anyone with doubts.
“Think of the rescue/recovery teams who will rescue you if you are injured or recover your remains if you do not survive,” he wrote. “If you think the storm is overhyped and exaggerated, please err on the side of caution. You can call me up Friday (contact information is at the end of this briefing) and yell at me all you want.”
Yet a NOAA survey taken afterward found that 79 percent of residents along the coast where warnings were issued said they were caught off-guard by the size of the surge. And that weighed heavily on forecasters in the two years since, Rhome said.
“I’ve heard the word accelerate more times than I can count,” he said, referring to the pressure to produce the maps.
The best use of the maps, forecasters say, is for planning. They’ll allow people to not only determine in advance whether they might need to evacuate, but track an escape route in case they wait.
“The only thing it doesn’t tell you is the timing of when that water is going to get there, and sometimes escape routes get cut off,” said Jeff Masters, director of meteorology at the popular website Weather Underground. “So you have to be aware of timing issues.”
The modeling for the maps is so far conservative, with the chance of storm surge exceeding the amount indicated only one in 10, Rhome explained. Masters and others hope the center can improve accuracy.
“It’s a reasonable worst-case scenario. It’s not an explicit forecast because nobody can predict exactly how much surge there is going to be in a given spot,” Rhome said.
The center plans to test and tinker with the maps this year and next before finalizing them. The center also plans to start issuing surge watches and warnings in 2015 to accompany wind warnings.
“Warnings have always been a call to action. They are our most formal and direct way of communicating,” Rhome said. “The analogy here is if you’re standing in the road, I might tell you standing in the road is dangerous. That’s the graphic. The warning is telling you if you don’t get out of the road, you’re going to get hit by a car.”

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2014/05/31/4150051/florida-riding-a-lucky-streak.html#storylink=cpy

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Hurricane Season

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 5, 2014

Hurricane SeasonIn the wake of a natural disaster, essentials such as fuel, food, ice, generators, lanterns, lumber, lodging etc may be short supply. Charging excessive prices for these and other necessities happens in awake of a storm or even afterwards.

Home repairs-

Know your contractor- Fly by Night contractors who are not do not have a licenses or insurance always offer the lowest price but also bring to the table problems.

Get at least 3 estimates. Be certain you see licenses and proof of insurance from all.

Be aware of solicitors offering services you don’t need. They may just be looking to see what is inside your home.

Avoid doing any work with a company that is requiring you to pay in just cash only. Make sure to get copies of all work done and checks that were written for your records.

At the end of the day make sure you are happy with the work that was done. Keep your records and do not be afraid of asking questions. If they don’t have the answers do not let them in.

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Hurricane Shutters- Whats right for you?

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 4, 2014

Hurricane Shutters- Whats right for you?

Here are some considerations as you review your choices in window protection:

Its a lot easier to pull on an accordion shutter across sliding glass doors or to push a button and watch motorized shutters roll down.

Here are some ideas to help you think of what is best for your home and yourself.

Can you install protection yourself? Screwing plywood panels in place is a heavy, awkward task that typically takes more than one person. Many plywood users who emerged from the 2004 season of back-to-back storms vowed never again use plywood.

Plywood is the covering of first or last resort for many homeowners, but it is heavy and hard to store and attached when a storm nears. If it gets soaked repeatedly ( as it will during hurricane season) the layers can peel apart causing the homeowner to replace plywood often. It is also a fire and termite risk. If you choose to use it the plywood panels should be measured, drilled and labeled in advance. A 4 x 8 foot sheet of 5/8″ plywood is about 16.99 these days at your local hardware stores.

If you already have window protection, are you ready to roll? Do you know where the Tapcons or wing nuts or other fasteners are? Do you know how to install or operate your protection?

Storage space can be a problem for plywood and for heavy stacks of Aluminum or Steel panels. Those metal panels can tear up your hands and cause serious injury if a stack of them drops or falls on you.

No matter what you need to protect your openings. CAT 5 SHUTTERS, LLC  can help. Contact us toll free at 1-877-cat-five or visit us on the web at www.cat5shutters.net for a free estimate.

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Emergency Municipality Numbers

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 2, 2014

Emergency Municipality Numbers

Find you Municipal  and keep the number so you will have it in case of an emergency this Hurricane season.

Atlantis- 561-965-1700
Belle Glade- 561-688-3400
Boca Raton- 561-368-6201
Boynton Beach- 561-732-8116
Briny Breezes- 561-276-7405
Cloud Lake- 561-688-3400
Delray- 561-243-7800
Glen Ridge- 561-688-3400
Golf- 561-688-3400
Greenacres- 561-642-2160
Haverhill- 561-689-0370
Highland Beach- 561-266-5800
Hypoluxo- 561-688-3400
Juno- 561-626-2100
Jupiter- 561-262-7548
Jupiter Inlet Colony- 561-746-3787
Lake Clarke Shores- 561-964-1114
Lake Park- 561-688-3400
Lake Worth- 561-688-3400
Lantana- 561-540-5700
Manalapan- 561-585-4030
Mangonia Park- 561-688-3400
North Palm Beach- 561-848-2525
Ocean Ridge- 561-732-8331
Pahokee- 561-688-3400
Palm Beach- 561-838-5454
Palm Beach Gardens- 561-799-4445
Palm Beach Shores- 561-844-3456
Palm Springs- 561-968-8243
Riviera Beach- 561-845-4123
Royal Palm Beach- 561-688-3400
South Bay- 561-388-3400
South Palm Beach- 561-586-2122
Tequesta- 561-575-6210
Wellington- 561-688-3400
West Palm Beach- 561-822-1900

Stay connect with CAT 5 Shutters, LLC for all your Hurricane needs.

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5 Affordable Home Projects to Prepare for a Hurricane

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 30, 2014

5 Affordable Home Projects to Prepare for a HurricaneThe Five S’s – Shingles, Soffits, Seals, Surroundings and Shutters

1. Shingles – Spend $4 on a 10 oz. tube of roofing cement and use it to re-adhere loose shingles to prevent water damage to your roof decking. One tube = 25 feet of shingles.

Focus on shingles near the roof edges and near gable ends.Place three one-inch diameter dabs of roofing cement under each shingle tab (near the edges).On gable ends, secure the three shingle tabs closest to the gable edge.This should be done at least two weeks in advance of a storm to allow the cement to adhere properly.

2. Soffits – Spend $6 for 10 oz. of polyurethane sealant and stainless steel screws, and use to secure your soffits to the walls and fascia to prevent them from blowing off.

IBHS research has found that soffit materials are missing in approximately 75 percent of homes that suffer significant hurricane damage. When soffit materials are blown off, the result is wind and water damage to the roof decking, attic and possibly the home’s interior. Apply a bead of sealant along the joint between the edge of the channel and the wall and the track holding the soffit panels.Install sharp pointed stainless steel screws through the fascia and channels so that they connect the soffit material.Apply sealant in the grooves where the fascia material butts up against the fascia and wall channel.

3. Seal Gaps – Spend $2 on 10 oz. of caulk and use to seal gaps in outer walls to prevent water intrusion.
 
Focus on the following areas: holes where wires, cables and pipes enter and exit the house;openings for cable TV and telephone lines;all the way around electrical boxes and circuit breaker panels;pipe penetrations including air conditioning refrigerant lines and condensate lines, water heater pressure relief lines and water pipes; andcracks around wall outlets, dryer vents, bathroom and kitchen vents and electrical devices such as wall lights.

4. Surroundings –Secure your surroundings to prevent damage from flying debris. Spend $3/bag and replace gravel/rock landscaping materials and walkways with a softer material, such as mulch or dirt.

In a particularly strong hurricane, gravel has been found in mail boxes and has shredded vinyl siding. Work with neighbors to make sure everyone’s home is protected from this risk.Secure loose objects in the yard, such as lawn chairs, toys, garbage cans or signs, so they don’t become flying missiles during high winds.Trim trees and shrubbery away from structures and remove any weakened sections of trees that might easily break off and fall onto structures.

5. Shutters –Spend $9-$30 per square foot of openings for shutters to protect against wind-borne debris and pressurization.

Determine what openings need protection; this should include all windows, entry doors, sliding glass doors, garage doors and gable end vents.Choose permanent window and door protection, or install permanent fasteners before storm warnings, and pre-cut shutter panels so they can be put in place quickly.

Hurricane starts June 1 and end November 30. Make sure you do what is needed to protect your investments and family.

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Hurricane Preparedness: Lining up your contractors

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 23, 2014

Hurricane Preparedness: Lining up your contractorsLicensed, insured, and in business

Professional licensing is a means by which the state of Florida regulates professionals who can cause harm through the malpractice and misconduct of their trades. Some of the diverse professionals regulated by professional licensing are CPAs, realtors, architects, and contractors. Many construction tradespeople are regulated because their work, if performed incorrectly, can cause fire, flood, and collapse. But, because not every construction tradesperson requires a professional license, verifying his or her compliancy with these laws is a two-step process. First, you need to determine if the contractor’s trade is regulated by licensing. Second, if licensing is required, you need to verify that the contractor’s license is current and active. This information is readily available in the database maintained by Florida’s Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR). To help ensure that you navigate to the state website, use the words “State of” in your search term. For example, the search terms “State of Florida DBPR” and “State of Florida contractor licensing” will prioritize DBPR as a search return. Once you navigate to DBPR’s website, you will see a link titled “Verify a License.” To determine what trades are regulated by professional licensing, click the dropdown menu under “License Type.” If a contractor requires licensing, you can then enter his or her name into the database to determine the license status. License complaints can also be viewed. Contractor insurance can also protect you from the harm that can befall you from unqualified practitioners. In construction, workers’ compensation insurance and general liability insurance are essential. A major difference between the two is that workers’ compensation covers the employees of a company while general liability covers the public affected by a company’s operation. In addition to personal injury, property damage may also be covered in a general liability policy. Because both types of claims can be costly, you must verify that a contractor has insurance and that the policy limits and terms are acceptable. Analysis of policies is best handled by your insurance agent, who will understand your business circumstances, as well as the complexities of insurance. But, you may want to perform some preliminary research before the experts step in. Using the Internet, you can verify a contractor’s workers’ compensation coverage with Florida’s Division of Workers’ Compensation. Authorized workers’ compensation exemptions can also be verified. This information is contained in a database that is readily marked and easy to use. To reach the state website, use a concise and accurate search term such as “State of Florida Worker’s Compensation.”
In contrast to workers’ compensation information that you can access through state government sources, you will need to verify the contractor’s general liability coverage with his or her insurance agent. You must request that the contractor have his or her agent mail you a certificate of insurance. This certificate contains important information about policy limits and special conditions, and it must be reviewed by your agent to ensure that you are adequately protected. For example, your agent can request that the certificate show if there are any exclusions, such as property damage, under the products/completed operations coverage form, as well as any exclusions related to uniquely hazardous construction activities, such as demolition. Your agent should explain the benefits of being listed as an “additional insured.” Although the government websites provides sound information about contractor insurance, frequent and comprehensive communication with your agent is essential.
Florida’s Secretary of State office has the important role of maintaining records. The Division of Corporations is a division with this office, and it maintains a business’s filings. The types of business entities include corporations, limited liability companies, partnerships, and sole proprietors doing business under an assumed, fictitious name. Because it is highly recommended that you contract with a business, in contrast to a person, you should ensure that the contractor’s company is in good standing with the state. In addition to verifying that the company is active, you can also view the date of registration to determine how long the company has been in business. Officers, directors, and registered agents are listed here.
Because owning a business and successfully running it are two separate matters, you may find the information held at the Building Departments useful. Building Departments are the state’s first line of defense against unlicensed and non-code-compliant work. Not only can the Building Department help you determine if a contractor meets the state’s requirements for licensing and insurance, it may also maintain a permit database that show the contractor’s customers and the inspection results. The Building Department may also have the blueprints and site plans used to construct your facility. If you are planning to alter your existing building, these documents may be helpful.
Qualifications and character
In addition to confirming that the contractor meets Florida’s requirements for contracting, it is also important that he or she meet certain standards of personal integrity. This is especially important when there are no state licensing and insurance regulations in place for the contractor’s trade. For example, Florida’s DBPR does not issue professional licenses to painters, flooring installers, and other tradesmen. Although referrals and references are essential (because you want an experienced contractor with a successful track record,) legal records can provide insight into a person’s possible criminal and civil offenses, such as fraud, drug abuse, and theft.
The Clerk of Court Office is the government office that performs court-related duties, such as the docketing and maintaining of civil and criminal records. Documents such as deeds, tax warrants, and claims of lien may also be recorded by the clerk’s office or at a separate office, such as the recorder’s or comptroller’s office. To get a general impression about a contractor’s legal history, you can read the docket entries, if records exist. To do a comprehensive search, look for records in the counties where the contractor works, lives, and maintains an office. You should also search using the contractor’s personal name and business name. When reviewing any legal information, strive for fairness and accuracy. Because legal information is often complex, you may want to seek counsel from an attorney.

Hope for the best, but plan for the worst
As with any undertaking, preparedness improves your chances of success. When you are prepared, you can act purposefully and in a timely manner. Without forethought, your efforts are likely to be inefficient and can waste time and money. Finding qualified contractors to repair or remodel your building is a focused process that takes time to do properly. It is not a task to undertake when an emergency is at hand. With qualified contractors ready to go and an inclusive scope of work to guide them, your projects are more likely to be done correctly, on time, and on budget, even following a disaster.

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Are You Ready for Hurricane Shutter Installation

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 20, 2014

Are You Ready for Hurricane Shutter InstallationHurricane season is approaching fast-June 1. Setting up storm shades is extremely beneficial because they provide a physical barrier from flying debris battering the glass windows of your home. While windows are created from sturdy glass, even a small piece of wood or other debris can be picked up and flung through the air by a 100 mile per hour gust directly at your window. Such things can easily shatter even sturdy glass windows. Making use of a heavy-duty, well-designed hurricane shutter system overlaid on your windowpane is going to help soak up the brunt of the collision and reduce the damage.

Are you ready for hurricane shutter installation? Here is what you need to know.
A well-defined description of hurricane shutters is provided by Weberdesigngroup.

Hurricane shutters are available as: storm panel hurricane shutters, accordion hurricane shutters, colonial hurricane shutters, Bahama hurricane shutters, and roll – down hurricane shutters.

Storm Panel Hurricane Shutters

Storm panel hurricane shutters are the most popular hurricane shutters out of all of the shutters that are available. For homeowners that choose to install storm panel hurricane shutters, they will need to also install metal tracts that will hold the sheets of steel or corrugated aluminum in place along the window. The storm panel hurricane shutters are created in a corrugated style so that the pieces can overlap one another, creating an even stronger resistance to the hurricane-force winds. Since there are different storm pane hurricane shutters that are available for installation, it is up to the home owner on which style they would prefer.

One style of the storm panel shutters are inserted to the top tract, while the bottom of the panel is fastened to the bottom tract, which lies underneath the window. It is important to cover the entire window so that there are very little gaps, if any, that the hurricane’s winds can get into and blow the shutters off of the windows. There are two other versions of the storm panels as well: the panels that must be installed on tracts that are permanently set into the walls of the home, and the other are shutters that must be aligned with bolts, quite similar to hanging up a shower curtain. Many people like to purchase the storm panel hurricane shutters because they are the most inexpensive out of all of the shutters. They can also be disassembled once the hurricane has passed, which does not leave the shutters on the house permanently. They are also quite durable, which is what many homeowners are looking for. On the downside, storm panel shutters often have sharp and jagged edges, are cumbersome to maneuver, and some types are too heavy for only one individual to install. Although there may be more cons to pros, the storm panel hurricane shutters are the most popular out of all of the hurricane shutters available on the market.

Accordion Hurricane Shutters

Another form of hurricane shutters are accordion hurricane shutters. Just as the name would suggest, the accordion hurricane shutters open and shut just as an accordion would. They are stored on tracts that are permanently placed into a home, and fold like an accordion on either side of the windows for storage. Many home owners like the accordion hurricane style, as it can offer some of the maximum protection from a hurricane’s strong and gusty winds. Also, many home owners like to have the accordion style installed on their homes so that they do not have to worry about trying to apply hurricane shutters when there is a storm that is fast approaching. The cons of having accordion shutters are that the shutters can look aesthetically unappealing on a home, and it is set permanently. As much, accordion shutters run on wheels at the bottom of the tracts. Should any of the wheels break while in use, they can ruin the effectiveness of the shutters from an impending hurricane.

Colonial Hurricane Shutters

Colonial hurricane shutters are another form of shutter protection that can be placed on a house in the hopes of warding off severe damage to a home. These shutters are created in a horizontal, slat-like fashion, quite similar to the old colonial style of window shadings. There are two pieces that latch together in the middle of the window, thus covering the window as protection against the storm. Although colonial shutters are still in use, they are not as popular as the other shutters. They are fastened to the house permanently, which can be a huge time saver in the event of an emergency and fast preparedness is needed. Many single home owners like colonial hurricane shutters, because only one person is needed to operate and install them for use. They also come in various ornamental styles, which can appease the homeowners. However, older, and some newer, versions of the colonial hurricane shutters must be adhered together with a rod that is centrally placed on the window. This can make for a much longer time for readiness for the hurricane time that can be used for other preparations.

Bahama Hurricane Shutters

The Bahama hurricane shutters are almost exactly like the colonial hurricane shutters, except they come in one piece instead of two. They are installed as permanent fixtures on the home and come in various decorative styles. Some homeowners will not work with the Bahama hurricane shutters, as they feel that they are not effective enough as an alternate version of hurricane shutters. They are not designed to be as rugged and sturdy as the older models and their counterparts, which worries many homeowners.

Roll-Up and Down Hurricane Shutters

Roll-down hurricane shutters are perhaps the best liked of the shutter systems, although it is also the most expensive. Roll-down hurricane shutters can be engaged for window protection at the push of a button. These shutter systems are installed at the top of the windows, and there is a permanent metal receptacle that houses the shutters. Once a centralized button is pushed, the roll-down shutters will drop from their homes and cover the windows. This is the best feature of the shutters, as it is easy on those that live on their own, or who may have a difficult time installing shutters by themselves. On the other hand, the shutters can fail if there is not a battery to back up the controls, leading to unprotected windows.

Protecting one’s home is the most important goal when selecting hurricane shutters. It is important to know which ones work well with the homeowner’s budget, as well as, if they want to invest in long-term shutters. Above all, selecting shutters that will be for the betterment of one’s safety is the best purchase to make.

For professional advise and hurricane shutter installation contact Cat 5 Shutters today. Visit our website at www.cat5shutters.net

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Are we lucky?

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 15, 2014

Are we lucky?Will this be the year the USA’s luck runs out?

With the Atlantic hurricane season starting June 1, the nation is enjoying two record streaks for a lack of hurricanes: It’s been nine years since the last hit from a “major” hurricane and also nine years since a hurricane of any sort hit Florida, traditionally the most hurricane-prone state in the nation.

Both streaks began on Oct. 24, 2005, when Category 3 Hurricane Wilma slammed into southwest Florida with 120-mph winds.

A “major” hurricane is a Category 3, 4, or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale of Hurricane Intensity; the minimum wind speed for a major hurricane is 111 mph.

“This is the longest period on record with no major hurricane landfalls since 1878, when reliable landfall records began,” says Colorado State University meteorologist and hurricane expert Phil Klotzbach.
Despite its fury, Hurricane/Superstorm Sandy, was a Category 1 hurricane, with maximum winds of 80 mph, when it made landfall in October 2012 in New Jersey. Sandy is a good example of how wind speed can be an inadequate measure of a hurricane’s ferocity.

Sandy killed dozens of people and did $65 billion damage in the USA. alone, the National Climatic Data Center reported.

Hurricane Ike battered the Texas coast in 2008, killing at least 112 people and doing $27 billion in damage, but it missed the “major” hurricane label by 1 mph when it slammed ashore with winds of 110 mph.
One explanation for the hiatus in major hurricanes: “Luck, and it will run out,” says Dennis Feltgen, a spokesman with the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

Quiet hurricane season predicted

“Luck has certainly played a role,” agrees Klotzbach. Also, steering currents have helped guide storms out to sea, he says.
“We have tended to have a trough of low pressure along the East Coast of the U.S. during the past eight years, which has helped steer storms away from the mainland,” said Klotzbach.
Florida’s nine-year hurricane-free streak is also notable for the state that sticks out into the hurricane zone like a sore thumb: Since 1851, 114 hurricanes have hit Florida, according to data from the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. This is 39% of the total number of U.S. hurricane strikes.
“These remarkable streaks must end sometime.” noted Roger Pielke, Jr., a professor of environmental studies at the University of Colorado,
“We need to be prepared that this would be the year that both streaks end,” added Feltgen.

Hurricane season begins June 1. Klotzbach and his team at Colorado State, which includes William Gray, the dean of hurricane forecasting, are predicting a below-average season, with only three hurricanes forecast to form in the Atlantic.
AccuWeather’s forecast, released today, also predicts a below-average season, with five hurricanes.
A season with few hurricanes doesn’t mean that the ones that do form will be weak: In 1992, only four hurricanes formed, but one of them was monstrous Hurricane Andrew, which killed dozens and caused $27 billion in damages as it battered south Florida.
Federal forecasters from the Climate Prediction Center will issue their forecast on May 22.

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