Hurrican Shutters

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Posts Tagged ‘hurricane preparedness’

Solid Waste Authority says what not to do

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 20, 2014

Solid Waste Authority says what not to do

Once a storm is named:

* Do not cut down trees or do any major yard work.

* Do not begin construction projects that produce debris.

*Once a watch or warning has been issued, do not trim vegetation of any kind.

* Mass cutting places a tremendous burden on the normal collection process and there is not enough equipment or manpower to collect the additional material before the storm makes landfall. You could put not only yourself at risk but your neighbors, as well.

* Do not take materials to the curb, transfer stations or landfill during a watch or a warning period. Services may be suspended and facilities closed early to prepare for the storm.

After the storm has passed:

*Keep household garbage, recycling and vegetative and/or construction storm debris in separate piles.

* SWA’s number one priority is the collection od household garbage.

* Securely containerize all household garbage in plastic bags or cans to be placed curbside on your schedule day.

* Don’t place any debris near or on a fence, mailbox, powerline equipment, poles, transformers, downed electrical wiring, water meters or storm drains.

* Be prepared to repair damage to swale areas from the specialized equipment used to collect storm debris.

Once a major storm has passed, the SWA’s response plan includes the following tasks:

*Asses all areas of unincorporated Palm Beach County to determine amount of damage, debris and hardest hit areas. Takes about 2-3 days to complete.

* Set up temporary debris sites. Takes about 3-4 days to complete.

* Deployment of specialized storm debris collection equipment and crews. Takes about 4-5 days to complete.

* Completely cleans up all the storm debris can take up to 180 days depending on how severe the storm was.

Be patient. Be safe. Be careful.

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Preparations for your Pet

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 20, 2014

Preparations for your Pet

* Have your pet micro chipped, so they can be identified if they go missing.

* Get your pets acclimated to a locking crate or carrier. Just leave it out and open so they can freely go in and out to get comfortable with it.

* Do not leave your pet behind and alone, they may find a way to get out and run away.

* Evacuations may last longer than a day so make sure to be prepared for a week or two if needed with their food and toys.

* Most public shelters do not allow pets. Make sure to find a pet friendly shelter and call ahead to be sure.

* Some hotels will slow pets for a storm, again always call ahead.

* Your vet or animal shelter may take in pets on a list prior to a storm coming, call and find out what steps you would need to do to get on that list.

* Be attentive to your pet even after a storm blows through. Streets and yards may be flooded and full of debris. Nails, wood, glass and other objects can injury your pet and yourself.

* It is easy for animal to become disorientated, and there will be lots of unusual smells and thing t o explore that may be hazardous to them. Down power lines, puddles and other things could harm them and your self, so pay attention when going for walks.

* Be aware of wild animals running loose looking for dry land or food, from raccoons to snakes to other creatures finding their way into your home.

No matter what the case may be, always be prepared. Your home your family and your pets.

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Floridians to get break on insurance bills

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 19, 2014

Floridians to get break on insurance billsTALLAHASSEE, Fla. —

Nearly 10 years after Hurricane Wilma lumbered through South Florida consumers across the state are finally going to stop paying the bill associated with that storm.

State officials on Tuesday agreed to end the 1.3 percent surcharge that is placed on most insurance policies, including homeowner and auto policies.

“This is good news for consumers,” said Jack Nicholson, chief operating officer for the fund that has been collecting the surcharge that some critics have labeled a “hurricane tax.”

The state was forced to place the emergency assessment on insurance bills after the backup fund used to help private insurers pay off claims ran out of money in the wake of Wilma. Wilma was the fourth storm of 2005 and the eighth storm that hit the state during a two-year period.

The Florida Hurricane Catastrophe Fund was forced to borrow a total of $2.61 billion to reimburse private insurers.
The assessment was initially expected to remain on insurance bills until July 2016. But the state was able to reach settlements with the last batch of insurers and has enough money left over to retire the bonds it issued.
The vote on Tuesday ensures that the assessment will no longer appear on policies renewed or issued on or after Jan. 1, 2015.

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Tracking the tropics

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 18, 2014

Tracking the tropicsQuick Summary:- Currently no tropical cyclones anywhere in the world

– Weak disturbance near Florida bringing showers and thunderstorms there; not currently showing signs of tropical development
– Eastern Pacific system could eventually develop, but not doing so yet

ATLANTIC, CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO

There’s an area of showers and thunderstorms with some twist evident on satellite/radar loops over the northwest Bahamas and parts of the Florida peninsula.
A couple earlier runs of the RPM model were eye-catching, showing the system spinning like a top and heading into Florida on Thursday.
Every once in a while one of these things at this time of year will quickly turn into a tropical depression or storm, and on general principle we keep an eye on systems in such close proximity to the U.S.; however there is currently no surface circulation (the rotation is ~2-4 miles up) and surface pressures in the area are higher than what is typically conducive to tropical cyclone formation, and for now that has to be considered a long shot.
We’ll monitor and let you know if that changes; regardless, cloud-to-ground lightning and locally heavy rain will be hazards from the thunderstorms, typical of summer in Florida.
Nothing else new to report in the Atlantic, Caribbean, or Gulf.

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Hurricane Preparation Guide

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 11, 2014

Hurricane Preparation GuideHurricane season is approaching fast. It begins on June 1st. Early preparation is important and necessary. Hurricanes are strong storms that cause life and property-threatening hazards such as flooding, storm surge, high winds and tornadoes. Preparation is the best protection against the dangers of a hurricane. Educate yourself about the types of hurricanes and prepare your home and your family before the hurricane season begins.

More than 35 million Americans live in regions most threatened by Atlantic hurricanes.

Hurricane Classification and Categories

Hurricanes are classified into five categories based on their wind speed, central pressure, and damage potential (see chart). Category Three and higher hurricanes are considered major hurricanes, though Categories One and Two are still extremely dangerous and warrant your full attention. All Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastal areas are subject to hurricanes or tropical storms. Parts of the Southwest United States and the Pacific Coast experience heavy rains and floods each year from hurricanes spawned off Mexico.

The Atlantic hurricane season lasts from June to November, with the peak season from mid-August to late October. Hurricanes can cause catastrophic damage to coastlines and several hundred miles inland. Winds can exceed 155 miles per hour. Hurricanes and tropical storms can also spawn tornadoes and microbursts, create storm surges along the coast, and cause extensive damage from heavy rainfall. Hurricanes are classified into five categories based on their wind speed, central pressure, and damage potential (see chart). Category Three and higher hurricanes are considered major hurricanes, though Categories One and Two are still extremely dangerous and warrant your full attention.

Hurricane Preparation from Red Cross:

Build a disaster supply kit or check the kit you prepared last year. Include a three-day supply of water and ready-to-eat non-perishable foods. Don’t forget a manual can opener, battery-powered radio, flashlight and extra batteries. Your kit should also have a first aid kit, prescription and non-prescription medications, and copies of important documents. Prepare a personal disaster and evacuation plan. Identify two meeting places—one near your home, and one outside your area in case you can’t return home. Make plans for your pets. Select an out-of-area emergency contact person. Be informed. Know what a hurricane WATCH means. If a hurricane WATCH is issued.
Listen to weather updates from your battery-powered or hand-cranked radio. Bring in outdoor objects such as lawn furniture, hanging plants, bicycles, toys and garden tools. Anchor objects that cannot be brought inside. Close all windows and doors. Cover windows with storm shutters or pre-cut plywood. If time permits, and you live in an identified surge zone, elevate furniture or move it to a higher floor to protect it from flooding. Fill your vehicle’s gas tank. Check your disaster supply kit to make sure items have not expired. 4. If a hurricane WARNING is issued:
Listen to the advice of local officials, and leave if they tell you to do so. Secure your home by unplugging appliances and turning off electricity and the main water valve. If you are not advised to evacuate, stay inside, away from windows, skylights and glass doors. Do NOT use open flames, such as candles and kerosene lamps, as a source of light. If power is lost, turn off appliances to reduce damage from a power surge when electricity is restored. Hurricane Protection with Hurricane ShuttersHurricane shutters protect from all types of storms. Cyclones in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, or South Pacific Ocean are called hurricanes. Tropical storms along the Northwest Pacific Ocean are referred to as typhoons.

Property owners along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean should strongly consider installing hurricane shutters. Category 5 hurricanes can result in structural damages in excess of 15 miles from the shore. Cat 5 hurricane shutters are recommended for all regions close to the shore.

Cats 5 Shutters has installed Hurricane Shutters, Storm Shutters, Roll-up and down shutters, Windows Shutters, Bahama Shutters, Accordion Shutters, Shutters for Windows and Hurricane Protection throughout multiple counties in South Florida.

Contact Cat 5 Shutters today to get professional advise and installation service.

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5 Affordable Home Projects to Prepare for a Hurricane

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 30, 2014

5 Affordable Home Projects to Prepare for a HurricaneThe Five S’s – Shingles, Soffits, Seals, Surroundings and Shutters

1. Shingles – Spend $4 on a 10 oz. tube of roofing cement and use it to re-adhere loose shingles to prevent water damage to your roof decking. One tube = 25 feet of shingles.

Focus on shingles near the roof edges and near gable ends.Place three one-inch diameter dabs of roofing cement under each shingle tab (near the edges).On gable ends, secure the three shingle tabs closest to the gable edge.This should be done at least two weeks in advance of a storm to allow the cement to adhere properly.

2. Soffits – Spend $6 for 10 oz. of polyurethane sealant and stainless steel screws, and use to secure your soffits to the walls and fascia to prevent them from blowing off.

IBHS research has found that soffit materials are missing in approximately 75 percent of homes that suffer significant hurricane damage. When soffit materials are blown off, the result is wind and water damage to the roof decking, attic and possibly the home’s interior. Apply a bead of sealant along the joint between the edge of the channel and the wall and the track holding the soffit panels.Install sharp pointed stainless steel screws through the fascia and channels so that they connect the soffit material.Apply sealant in the grooves where the fascia material butts up against the fascia and wall channel.

3. Seal Gaps – Spend $2 on 10 oz. of caulk and use to seal gaps in outer walls to prevent water intrusion.
 
Focus on the following areas: holes where wires, cables and pipes enter and exit the house;openings for cable TV and telephone lines;all the way around electrical boxes and circuit breaker panels;pipe penetrations including air conditioning refrigerant lines and condensate lines, water heater pressure relief lines and water pipes; andcracks around wall outlets, dryer vents, bathroom and kitchen vents and electrical devices such as wall lights.

4. Surroundings –Secure your surroundings to prevent damage from flying debris. Spend $3/bag and replace gravel/rock landscaping materials and walkways with a softer material, such as mulch or dirt.

In a particularly strong hurricane, gravel has been found in mail boxes and has shredded vinyl siding. Work with neighbors to make sure everyone’s home is protected from this risk.Secure loose objects in the yard, such as lawn chairs, toys, garbage cans or signs, so they don’t become flying missiles during high winds.Trim trees and shrubbery away from structures and remove any weakened sections of trees that might easily break off and fall onto structures.

5. Shutters –Spend $9-$30 per square foot of openings for shutters to protect against wind-borne debris and pressurization.

Determine what openings need protection; this should include all windows, entry doors, sliding glass doors, garage doors and gable end vents.Choose permanent window and door protection, or install permanent fasteners before storm warnings, and pre-cut shutter panels so they can be put in place quickly.

Hurricane starts June 1 and end November 30. Make sure you do what is needed to protect your investments and family.

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Hurricane Preparedness: Lining up your contractors

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 23, 2014

Hurricane Preparedness: Lining up your contractorsLicensed, insured, and in business

Professional licensing is a means by which the state of Florida regulates professionals who can cause harm through the malpractice and misconduct of their trades. Some of the diverse professionals regulated by professional licensing are CPAs, realtors, architects, and contractors. Many construction tradespeople are regulated because their work, if performed incorrectly, can cause fire, flood, and collapse. But, because not every construction tradesperson requires a professional license, verifying his or her compliancy with these laws is a two-step process. First, you need to determine if the contractor’s trade is regulated by licensing. Second, if licensing is required, you need to verify that the contractor’s license is current and active. This information is readily available in the database maintained by Florida’s Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR). To help ensure that you navigate to the state website, use the words “State of” in your search term. For example, the search terms “State of Florida DBPR” and “State of Florida contractor licensing” will prioritize DBPR as a search return. Once you navigate to DBPR’s website, you will see a link titled “Verify a License.” To determine what trades are regulated by professional licensing, click the dropdown menu under “License Type.” If a contractor requires licensing, you can then enter his or her name into the database to determine the license status. License complaints can also be viewed. Contractor insurance can also protect you from the harm that can befall you from unqualified practitioners. In construction, workers’ compensation insurance and general liability insurance are essential. A major difference between the two is that workers’ compensation covers the employees of a company while general liability covers the public affected by a company’s operation. In addition to personal injury, property damage may also be covered in a general liability policy. Because both types of claims can be costly, you must verify that a contractor has insurance and that the policy limits and terms are acceptable. Analysis of policies is best handled by your insurance agent, who will understand your business circumstances, as well as the complexities of insurance. But, you may want to perform some preliminary research before the experts step in. Using the Internet, you can verify a contractor’s workers’ compensation coverage with Florida’s Division of Workers’ Compensation. Authorized workers’ compensation exemptions can also be verified. This information is contained in a database that is readily marked and easy to use. To reach the state website, use a concise and accurate search term such as “State of Florida Worker’s Compensation.”
In contrast to workers’ compensation information that you can access through state government sources, you will need to verify the contractor’s general liability coverage with his or her insurance agent. You must request that the contractor have his or her agent mail you a certificate of insurance. This certificate contains important information about policy limits and special conditions, and it must be reviewed by your agent to ensure that you are adequately protected. For example, your agent can request that the certificate show if there are any exclusions, such as property damage, under the products/completed operations coverage form, as well as any exclusions related to uniquely hazardous construction activities, such as demolition. Your agent should explain the benefits of being listed as an “additional insured.” Although the government websites provides sound information about contractor insurance, frequent and comprehensive communication with your agent is essential.
Florida’s Secretary of State office has the important role of maintaining records. The Division of Corporations is a division with this office, and it maintains a business’s filings. The types of business entities include corporations, limited liability companies, partnerships, and sole proprietors doing business under an assumed, fictitious name. Because it is highly recommended that you contract with a business, in contrast to a person, you should ensure that the contractor’s company is in good standing with the state. In addition to verifying that the company is active, you can also view the date of registration to determine how long the company has been in business. Officers, directors, and registered agents are listed here.
Because owning a business and successfully running it are two separate matters, you may find the information held at the Building Departments useful. Building Departments are the state’s first line of defense against unlicensed and non-code-compliant work. Not only can the Building Department help you determine if a contractor meets the state’s requirements for licensing and insurance, it may also maintain a permit database that show the contractor’s customers and the inspection results. The Building Department may also have the blueprints and site plans used to construct your facility. If you are planning to alter your existing building, these documents may be helpful.
Qualifications and character
In addition to confirming that the contractor meets Florida’s requirements for contracting, it is also important that he or she meet certain standards of personal integrity. This is especially important when there are no state licensing and insurance regulations in place for the contractor’s trade. For example, Florida’s DBPR does not issue professional licenses to painters, flooring installers, and other tradesmen. Although referrals and references are essential (because you want an experienced contractor with a successful track record,) legal records can provide insight into a person’s possible criminal and civil offenses, such as fraud, drug abuse, and theft.
The Clerk of Court Office is the government office that performs court-related duties, such as the docketing and maintaining of civil and criminal records. Documents such as deeds, tax warrants, and claims of lien may also be recorded by the clerk’s office or at a separate office, such as the recorder’s or comptroller’s office. To get a general impression about a contractor’s legal history, you can read the docket entries, if records exist. To do a comprehensive search, look for records in the counties where the contractor works, lives, and maintains an office. You should also search using the contractor’s personal name and business name. When reviewing any legal information, strive for fairness and accuracy. Because legal information is often complex, you may want to seek counsel from an attorney.

Hope for the best, but plan for the worst
As with any undertaking, preparedness improves your chances of success. When you are prepared, you can act purposefully and in a timely manner. Without forethought, your efforts are likely to be inefficient and can waste time and money. Finding qualified contractors to repair or remodel your building is a focused process that takes time to do properly. It is not a task to undertake when an emergency is at hand. With qualified contractors ready to go and an inclusive scope of work to guide them, your projects are more likely to be done correctly, on time, and on budget, even following a disaster.

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Are we lucky?

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 15, 2014

Are we lucky?Will this be the year the USA’s luck runs out?

With the Atlantic hurricane season starting June 1, the nation is enjoying two record streaks for a lack of hurricanes: It’s been nine years since the last hit from a “major” hurricane and also nine years since a hurricane of any sort hit Florida, traditionally the most hurricane-prone state in the nation.

Both streaks began on Oct. 24, 2005, when Category 3 Hurricane Wilma slammed into southwest Florida with 120-mph winds.

A “major” hurricane is a Category 3, 4, or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale of Hurricane Intensity; the minimum wind speed for a major hurricane is 111 mph.

“This is the longest period on record with no major hurricane landfalls since 1878, when reliable landfall records began,” says Colorado State University meteorologist and hurricane expert Phil Klotzbach.
Despite its fury, Hurricane/Superstorm Sandy, was a Category 1 hurricane, with maximum winds of 80 mph, when it made landfall in October 2012 in New Jersey. Sandy is a good example of how wind speed can be an inadequate measure of a hurricane’s ferocity.

Sandy killed dozens of people and did $65 billion damage in the USA. alone, the National Climatic Data Center reported.

Hurricane Ike battered the Texas coast in 2008, killing at least 112 people and doing $27 billion in damage, but it missed the “major” hurricane label by 1 mph when it slammed ashore with winds of 110 mph.
One explanation for the hiatus in major hurricanes: “Luck, and it will run out,” says Dennis Feltgen, a spokesman with the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

Quiet hurricane season predicted

“Luck has certainly played a role,” agrees Klotzbach. Also, steering currents have helped guide storms out to sea, he says.
“We have tended to have a trough of low pressure along the East Coast of the U.S. during the past eight years, which has helped steer storms away from the mainland,” said Klotzbach.
Florida’s nine-year hurricane-free streak is also notable for the state that sticks out into the hurricane zone like a sore thumb: Since 1851, 114 hurricanes have hit Florida, according to data from the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. This is 39% of the total number of U.S. hurricane strikes.
“These remarkable streaks must end sometime.” noted Roger Pielke, Jr., a professor of environmental studies at the University of Colorado,
“We need to be prepared that this would be the year that both streaks end,” added Feltgen.

Hurricane season begins June 1. Klotzbach and his team at Colorado State, which includes William Gray, the dean of hurricane forecasting, are predicting a below-average season, with only three hurricanes forecast to form in the Atlantic.
AccuWeather’s forecast, released today, also predicts a below-average season, with five hurricanes.
A season with few hurricanes doesn’t mean that the ones that do form will be weak: In 1992, only four hurricanes formed, but one of them was monstrous Hurricane Andrew, which killed dozens and caused $27 billion in damages as it battered south Florida.
Federal forecasters from the Climate Prediction Center will issue their forecast on May 22.

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Hurricane Shutters FAQ

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 13, 2014

Hurricane Shutters FAQWhen it comes to Hurricane Shutters you need to know that they will indeed stand up to, well, a hurricane. Your Hurricane Shutters will be that first line of defense that keeps your windows, and the inside of your home, intact. To make sure that Hurricane Shutters will indeed stand up to their name the State of Florida requires independent testing and review by a Florida licensed professional engineer. Once they have verified that the shutters will indeed withstand a hurricane the product is approved.

Q: Should I tape my windows when a hurricane threatens?

A: NO! It is a waste of effort, time, and tape. It offers little strength to the glass and NO protection against flying debris. After the storm passes you will spend many a hot summer afternoon trying to scrape the old, baked-on tape off your windows (assuming they weren’t shattered). Once a Hurricane Warning has been issued you would be better off spending your time putting up shutters over doors and windows.

Q: Should I put shutters over my doors ???

A: Obviously sliding glass doors, french doors or any door with considerable glass in it should be protected. Some double doors or garage doors should either be shuttered or reinforced. In Hurricane Andrew many of these type doors gave way.

Q: Why should I get hurricane shutters ?

A: People who live in coastal counties from Texas to Maine, and those in other hurricane prone areas, such as most of the Florida peninsula, will find shutters an excellent investment for protecting their lives and property. They protect against wind and wind-borne debris. These shutters protect not only the windows or doors they cover, but also possessions and people inside the building. Once a window or door has been breeched by hurricane winds tremendous pressure is brought to bear on interior walls and upward pressure on the building’s roof. This can lead to roof failure which exposes the entire contents of the building to the storm. Shutters are a first line of defense against the hurricane. Much of the damage and building failure in Hurricane Andrew could have been prevented by well installed hurricane shutters over windows and doors.

Q: Why should I bother with shutters if I live in an evacuation zone?

A: Shutters will protect your house and possessions from wind damage whether you are there or not. If the storm surge should reach your home then the shutters won’t protect against the flood of water. But not every place in the evacuation zone will flood. You should take every reasonable precaution to protect your property.

Q: What are the best kind of shutters ?

A: The best kind are those that are affordable, are easy to install, and offer the greatest protection. Which of these properties is most important to you depends on individual circumstances. For a disabled or elderly person it may be ease of installation with either an automatic closing mechanism or accordion type shutters. For those with limited incomes plywood shutters may be the only affordable option. For most people the best compromise would be steel panels, which offer good protection, but are expensive and take effort to install. Aluminum panels are lighter and easier to install, but offer less protection and may not meet the building code for your area.
Which ever type you decide on it is important to remember that shutters are only as good as the quality of their installation. Ensure that the shutters or their anchors are installed by qualified workmen and that quality materials that meet the building code for your area are used.

Q: What about the plastic film and shatter resistant windows I’ve heard about ?

A: Although these are remarkable products that are being improved every year, they are no substitute for shutters. If you have windows that for some reason, such as access, can’t be shuttered then you may wish to consider using the film or installing the shatter resistant glass.
Remember that the film only protects the glass. The frame is still under pressure and the whole window could fail. Windows with these treatments will still suffer damage from the impact of debris and may have to be replaced after a storm, whereas a shutter would take most or all of the energy of such an impact. Films and special glasses also might not meet the building code for your area.

Q: How do I choose an installation company I can trust ?

A: The same way you go about choosing any company that performs a service. Make sure they are licensed, get references, and then check the references. Ask your neighbors and friends about who installed their shutters and if they had any complaints or recommendations. Check out a company with the Better Business Bureau, your local licensing authority, or contractor association.

Q: When is the best time to get my shutters installed ?
 
A: The best time to have shutters installed is when the house is built so they can be a part of the design. If you own a house without shutters have them installed as soon as is practical. Keep in mind that the beginning of hurricane season may be a busy time for most installation companies. Do NOT wait until a Hurricane Watch is issued for your area.
At the start of each hurricane season you should test out your shutters. For permanently installed shutters try closing each one to make sure they work smoothly and lock tight. For panels and plywood shutters try a couple of windows and doors to ensure the hardware works and check the time you need to complete the job. Check all panels for warpage or other damage which could compromise its integrity. Repair any problems at this time so that everything is ready when a storm threatens.

When a Hurricane Watch is issued for your area check all mechanisms and hardware again, and maybe pre-install the more difficult shutters. If you live in an evacuation zone and it will take 2 or 3 hours to complete your shutter installation, you may want to start during the Watch phase. If you are not in an evacuation zone you should time your installation early in the Warning phase so that you are not struggling with panels during high winds.

Q: What if I can’t afford commercial shutters ?

A: The least expensive, effective method of protecting windows is probably using plywood. The key to plywood shutters is thickness and installation. Use at least 5/8 inch exterior grade plywood, it makes the shutters heavier but safer. They should be cut to fit inside the window frame, installed prior to hurricane season, marked for which window they are made for, and stored with their hardware, preferably in a dry location. Heat and moisture over time will warp plywood, and a good fit is essential to their effectiveness.

If even these shutters seem too expensive consider making them for two or three windows at a time, starting with the most vulnerable. After a few years you will have your whole house ready.

Q: Can condominium associations prohibit shutters ?

A: The short answer in Florida is NO. Chapter 718 of Florida Statutes of the Comdominium Act (1991) permits each board of administration to adopt specifications as to color, style, etc., but all specifications “shall comply with the applicable building code”. The Florida statutes further state “… a board shall not refuse to approve the installation or replacement of hurricane shutters conforming to the specifications adopted by the board.”

No matter what hurricane needs you have contact CAT 5 Shutters, LLC for a free estimate.

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Know The Quality of Your Hurricane Window Shutters

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 13, 2014

Know The Quality of Your Hurricane Window ShuttersAt first glance, low quality window shutters may look like high quality shutters, but they rarely perform the same. Fortunately, you can tell the difference between the two by taking a closer look at construction, design, and thickness.

Construction

High quality shutters use specific hardware and building techniques that increase durability and life. For starters, high quality window shutters use butt hinges. Butt hinges attach the shutter to the house and are the most durable type of hinge. Next, high quality window shutters use a joining method called rabbeting, which works better than glue or other joining materials.

Low quality window shutters are use opposite methods of attaching and joining. Non-mortise hinges are commonly used rather than butt hinges because they’re cheaper and easier to install. They fasten the shutter to the house and are easy to remove, so the hold is weaker. And instead of rabbeting, low quality shutters use glue or other weaker materials to join pieces together. This means the lower quality shutter is more likely to break and peel.
Low quality windows shutters use thin panels, called louvers, instead of thicker ones. The result is a flimsy, low quality look that just doesn’t hold up over time.

Another difference between low quality and high quality shutters is the techniques used to paint them. Low quality window shutters use one coat of paint and high quality shutters use two or more coats for a strong finish. One coat of paint will fade and peel faster than multiple coats.

Design

Low quality shutters have four louvers or less. High quality ones have five or more. The limited number of louvers means low quality shutters are cut-to-fit. Cut-to-fit designs are inexpensive to make because they’re made to predetermined sizes with fewer louvers. The design also results in a lower quality look.
High quality shutters aren’t cut-to-fit. They’re made to fit the dimensions of a specific window. They’re carefully constructed to be in proportion with the shutter rails and louver area, resulting in a balanced shutter that allows more light and air to enter.

Thickness Stiles are the vertical pieces on the sides of each panel. Stile thickness on a high quality shutter is anywhere from 1 to 1 1/16 inches thick. The stiles on a low quality shutter are around 15/16 inches thick. Thick material creates a more stable the shutter. It is also sag-proof and less likely to warp over time.

When it comes to securing the safety of your family, home and business during severe weather, only the finest storm protection will do. If you live in Florida and need a quote call Cat 5 Shutters LLC. Call us toll free at 1-877-CAT-FIVE.

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