Hurrican Shutters

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Posts Tagged ‘HURICANE SHUTTER GUIDE’

Low pressure system likely to become tropical depression or storm

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 30, 2014

Low pressure system likely to become tropical depression or storm1. Shower and thunderstorm activity remains minimal in association with
a low pressure area located about 140 miles east-northeast of
Melbourne, Florida. However, surface pressures are falling, and
environmental conditions are forecast to become more conducive for
development during the next few days. A tropical depression is
likely to form by mid-week while the system moves slowly
southwestward and thens turns northward and northeastward near the
southeastern United States coast. An Air Force Reserve
reconnaissance aircraft is scheduled to investigate the low this
afternoon, if necessary.

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Tracking the tropics

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 18, 2014

Tracking the tropicsQuick Summary:- Currently no tropical cyclones anywhere in the world

– Weak disturbance near Florida bringing showers and thunderstorms there; not currently showing signs of tropical development
– Eastern Pacific system could eventually develop, but not doing so yet

ATLANTIC, CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO

There’s an area of showers and thunderstorms with some twist evident on satellite/radar loops over the northwest Bahamas and parts of the Florida peninsula.
A couple earlier runs of the RPM model were eye-catching, showing the system spinning like a top and heading into Florida on Thursday.
Every once in a while one of these things at this time of year will quickly turn into a tropical depression or storm, and on general principle we keep an eye on systems in such close proximity to the U.S.; however there is currently no surface circulation (the rotation is ~2-4 miles up) and surface pressures in the area are higher than what is typically conducive to tropical cyclone formation, and for now that has to be considered a long shot.
We’ll monitor and let you know if that changes; regardless, cloud-to-ground lightning and locally heavy rain will be hazards from the thunderstorms, typical of summer in Florida.
Nothing else new to report in the Atlantic, Caribbean, or Gulf.

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Types of Hurricane Damage

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 17, 2014

Types of Hurricane DamageRainfall induced flooding

The heavy rains associated with a tropical weather system are responsible not only for major flooding in areas where the storm initially strikes, but also can affect areas hundreds of miles from where the storm originally made landfall.

During landfall, it is not uncommon for 5-10 inches of rain to fall. If the storm is large and moving slowly, rainfall could be even more excessive. As the storm moves inland, and is downgraded to a tropical depression, the continued circulation, tropical moisture, and topography can contribute to copious amounts of rainfall.

Intense flooding also can occur from tropical depressions and storms that do not reach hurricane strength.

Storm surge

Storm surge is a rapid rise in the level of water that moves onto land as the eye of the storm makes landfall. Generally speaking, the stronger the hurricane, the greater the storm surge.

As a hurricane approaches the coast, its winds drive water toward the shore. Once the edge of the storm reaches the shallow waters of the continental shelf, water piles up. Winds of hurricane strength force the water onto shore.

At first, the water level climbs slowly, but as the eye of the storm approaches, water rises rapidly. Wave after wave hits the coast as tons of moving water hammer away at any structure on the coastline. A cubic yard of water weighs about 1,700 pounds.

The surge is greater if a hurricane’s track is perpendicular to the coastline, allowing the surge to build higher. The storm surge is also greater if the storm affects a bay or if it makes landfall at high tide. The greatest storm surge occurs to the right of where the eye makes landfall.

Winds

The winds of a hurricane range from 74 mph (65 knots) in a minimal storm to greater than 155 mph (136 knots) in a catastrophic one. Accurate readings of high wind gusts during landfall are difficult to obtain because anemometers (wind-speed measuring devices) at reporting stations can be ripped from their foundations.

Wind is responsible for much of the structural damage caused by hurricanes. High winds uproot trees and tear down power lines. The maximum winds from fast moving and powerful storms may remain high, even when the storm is well inland. Often this is actual wind speed combined with the speed of the storm.

Tornadoes

Tropical cyclones also can trigger tornadoes. Each storm has a unique pattern of tornadoes whose frequency and occurrence is highly variable from one storm to the next.

Tornadoes spawned from hurricanes are more likely during an intense hurricane or one that is intensifying at or near landfall.

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Hurricane Preparation Guide

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 11, 2014

Hurricane Preparation GuideHurricane season is approaching fast. It begins on June 1st. Early preparation is important and necessary. Hurricanes are strong storms that cause life and property-threatening hazards such as flooding, storm surge, high winds and tornadoes. Preparation is the best protection against the dangers of a hurricane. Educate yourself about the types of hurricanes and prepare your home and your family before the hurricane season begins.

More than 35 million Americans live in regions most threatened by Atlantic hurricanes.

Hurricane Classification and Categories

Hurricanes are classified into five categories based on their wind speed, central pressure, and damage potential (see chart). Category Three and higher hurricanes are considered major hurricanes, though Categories One and Two are still extremely dangerous and warrant your full attention. All Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastal areas are subject to hurricanes or tropical storms. Parts of the Southwest United States and the Pacific Coast experience heavy rains and floods each year from hurricanes spawned off Mexico.

The Atlantic hurricane season lasts from June to November, with the peak season from mid-August to late October. Hurricanes can cause catastrophic damage to coastlines and several hundred miles inland. Winds can exceed 155 miles per hour. Hurricanes and tropical storms can also spawn tornadoes and microbursts, create storm surges along the coast, and cause extensive damage from heavy rainfall. Hurricanes are classified into five categories based on their wind speed, central pressure, and damage potential (see chart). Category Three and higher hurricanes are considered major hurricanes, though Categories One and Two are still extremely dangerous and warrant your full attention.

Hurricane Preparation from Red Cross:

Build a disaster supply kit or check the kit you prepared last year. Include a three-day supply of water and ready-to-eat non-perishable foods. Don’t forget a manual can opener, battery-powered radio, flashlight and extra batteries. Your kit should also have a first aid kit, prescription and non-prescription medications, and copies of important documents. Prepare a personal disaster and evacuation plan. Identify two meeting places—one near your home, and one outside your area in case you can’t return home. Make plans for your pets. Select an out-of-area emergency contact person. Be informed. Know what a hurricane WATCH means. If a hurricane WATCH is issued.
Listen to weather updates from your battery-powered or hand-cranked radio. Bring in outdoor objects such as lawn furniture, hanging plants, bicycles, toys and garden tools. Anchor objects that cannot be brought inside. Close all windows and doors. Cover windows with storm shutters or pre-cut plywood. If time permits, and you live in an identified surge zone, elevate furniture or move it to a higher floor to protect it from flooding. Fill your vehicle’s gas tank. Check your disaster supply kit to make sure items have not expired. 4. If a hurricane WARNING is issued:
Listen to the advice of local officials, and leave if they tell you to do so. Secure your home by unplugging appliances and turning off electricity and the main water valve. If you are not advised to evacuate, stay inside, away from windows, skylights and glass doors. Do NOT use open flames, such as candles and kerosene lamps, as a source of light. If power is lost, turn off appliances to reduce damage from a power surge when electricity is restored. Hurricane Protection with Hurricane ShuttersHurricane shutters protect from all types of storms. Cyclones in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, or South Pacific Ocean are called hurricanes. Tropical storms along the Northwest Pacific Ocean are referred to as typhoons.

Property owners along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean should strongly consider installing hurricane shutters. Category 5 hurricanes can result in structural damages in excess of 15 miles from the shore. Cat 5 hurricane shutters are recommended for all regions close to the shore.

Cats 5 Shutters has installed Hurricane Shutters, Storm Shutters, Roll-up and down shutters, Windows Shutters, Bahama Shutters, Accordion Shutters, Shutters for Windows and Hurricane Protection throughout multiple counties in South Florida.

Contact Cat 5 Shutters today to get professional advise and installation service.

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Hurricane Shutters- Whats right for you?

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 4, 2014

Hurricane Shutters- Whats right for you?

Here are some considerations as you review your choices in window protection:

Its a lot easier to pull on an accordion shutter across sliding glass doors or to push a button and watch motorized shutters roll down.

Here are some ideas to help you think of what is best for your home and yourself.

Can you install protection yourself? Screwing plywood panels in place is a heavy, awkward task that typically takes more than one person. Many plywood users who emerged from the 2004 season of back-to-back storms vowed never again use plywood.

Plywood is the covering of first or last resort for many homeowners, but it is heavy and hard to store and attached when a storm nears. If it gets soaked repeatedly ( as it will during hurricane season) the layers can peel apart causing the homeowner to replace plywood often. It is also a fire and termite risk. If you choose to use it the plywood panels should be measured, drilled and labeled in advance. A 4 x 8 foot sheet of 5/8″ plywood is about 16.99 these days at your local hardware stores.

If you already have window protection, are you ready to roll? Do you know where the Tapcons or wing nuts or other fasteners are? Do you know how to install or operate your protection?

Storage space can be a problem for plywood and for heavy stacks of Aluminum or Steel panels. Those metal panels can tear up your hands and cause serious injury if a stack of them drops or falls on you.

No matter what you need to protect your openings. CAT 5 SHUTTERS, LLC  can help. Contact us toll free at 1-877-cat-five or visit us on the web at www.cat5shutters.net for a free estimate.

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Emergency Municipality Numbers

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 2, 2014

Emergency Municipality Numbers

Find you Municipal  and keep the number so you will have it in case of an emergency this Hurricane season.

Atlantis- 561-965-1700
Belle Glade- 561-688-3400
Boca Raton- 561-368-6201
Boynton Beach- 561-732-8116
Briny Breezes- 561-276-7405
Cloud Lake- 561-688-3400
Delray- 561-243-7800
Glen Ridge- 561-688-3400
Golf- 561-688-3400
Greenacres- 561-642-2160
Haverhill- 561-689-0370
Highland Beach- 561-266-5800
Hypoluxo- 561-688-3400
Juno- 561-626-2100
Jupiter- 561-262-7548
Jupiter Inlet Colony- 561-746-3787
Lake Clarke Shores- 561-964-1114
Lake Park- 561-688-3400
Lake Worth- 561-688-3400
Lantana- 561-540-5700
Manalapan- 561-585-4030
Mangonia Park- 561-688-3400
North Palm Beach- 561-848-2525
Ocean Ridge- 561-732-8331
Pahokee- 561-688-3400
Palm Beach- 561-838-5454
Palm Beach Gardens- 561-799-4445
Palm Beach Shores- 561-844-3456
Palm Springs- 561-968-8243
Riviera Beach- 561-845-4123
Royal Palm Beach- 561-688-3400
South Bay- 561-388-3400
South Palm Beach- 561-586-2122
Tequesta- 561-575-6210
Wellington- 561-688-3400
West Palm Beach- 561-822-1900

Stay connect with CAT 5 Shutters, LLC for all your Hurricane needs.

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5 Affordable Home Projects to Prepare for a Hurricane

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 30, 2014

5 Affordable Home Projects to Prepare for a HurricaneThe Five S’s – Shingles, Soffits, Seals, Surroundings and Shutters

1. Shingles – Spend $4 on a 10 oz. tube of roofing cement and use it to re-adhere loose shingles to prevent water damage to your roof decking. One tube = 25 feet of shingles.

Focus on shingles near the roof edges and near gable ends.Place three one-inch diameter dabs of roofing cement under each shingle tab (near the edges).On gable ends, secure the three shingle tabs closest to the gable edge.This should be done at least two weeks in advance of a storm to allow the cement to adhere properly.

2. Soffits – Spend $6 for 10 oz. of polyurethane sealant and stainless steel screws, and use to secure your soffits to the walls and fascia to prevent them from blowing off.

IBHS research has found that soffit materials are missing in approximately 75 percent of homes that suffer significant hurricane damage. When soffit materials are blown off, the result is wind and water damage to the roof decking, attic and possibly the home’s interior. Apply a bead of sealant along the joint between the edge of the channel and the wall and the track holding the soffit panels.Install sharp pointed stainless steel screws through the fascia and channels so that they connect the soffit material.Apply sealant in the grooves where the fascia material butts up against the fascia and wall channel.

3. Seal Gaps – Spend $2 on 10 oz. of caulk and use to seal gaps in outer walls to prevent water intrusion.
 
Focus on the following areas: holes where wires, cables and pipes enter and exit the house;openings for cable TV and telephone lines;all the way around electrical boxes and circuit breaker panels;pipe penetrations including air conditioning refrigerant lines and condensate lines, water heater pressure relief lines and water pipes; andcracks around wall outlets, dryer vents, bathroom and kitchen vents and electrical devices such as wall lights.

4. Surroundings –Secure your surroundings to prevent damage from flying debris. Spend $3/bag and replace gravel/rock landscaping materials and walkways with a softer material, such as mulch or dirt.

In a particularly strong hurricane, gravel has been found in mail boxes and has shredded vinyl siding. Work with neighbors to make sure everyone’s home is protected from this risk.Secure loose objects in the yard, such as lawn chairs, toys, garbage cans or signs, so they don’t become flying missiles during high winds.Trim trees and shrubbery away from structures and remove any weakened sections of trees that might easily break off and fall onto structures.

5. Shutters –Spend $9-$30 per square foot of openings for shutters to protect against wind-borne debris and pressurization.

Determine what openings need protection; this should include all windows, entry doors, sliding glass doors, garage doors and gable end vents.Choose permanent window and door protection, or install permanent fasteners before storm warnings, and pre-cut shutter panels so they can be put in place quickly.

Hurricane starts June 1 and end November 30. Make sure you do what is needed to protect your investments and family.

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Why Consider Stainless Steel Screen Shutters

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 22, 2014

Why Consider Stainless Steel Screen ShuttersIf you live in a hurricane prone area, such as South Florida, hurricane protection with hurricane shutters is a must. Shutters are frequently constructed from steel or aluminum, but homeowners sometimes use the low-cost alternative of plywood. The shutters are affixed to the outside of the building with screws or hurricane clips.

What makes stainless screens unique?

3 Main Benefits

Hurricane Protection Security Device U.S. Department of Energy Certified Device to Block UV rays and heat gain.Stainless Steel Storm Shutters Offer a pleasing exterior look as well as protection. Stainless mesh on operable doors provides more security than steel security doors, but allows gentle breezes to pass through.
Turn your regular windows into security windows without adding security bars or window security bars. Stainless mesh is just slightly heavier looking than regular bug mesh, but has the strength of rolling steel security doors. Operable patio door and window mesh available Meets the large missile impact test for Category 5 hurricanes Prevents glass breakage from flying debris Shields windows from gale force winds and hail The mesh surface tension allows light breezes to pass through Roll-a-way stainless steel mesh is aesthetically subtle compared to security bars, adding steel security doors, or converting to thick glass security windows.

What Else Should You Know?

Cat 5 stainless steel hurricane protection will save you money on your electric bill on the window exposed to the sun. You may also be entitled to a discount from your insurance company. We are the first in the industry to pass the tough Dade County hurricane protocol. Offering 24/7 protection, no more worries for the last minute installation rush of cumbersome, heavy sharp edged or clear hurricane storm panels as the hurricane approaches. Think green!

Energy savings is another huge benefit of this super green screen system. Green because it provides sun protection that can reduce the transmitted heat on your interior furnishings by 25% and reduce transmitted harmful UV Rays on interior surfaces by 95%. This could also save you money on your utility cost. These green screens won’t darken and compromise your view. The Florida Energy Office has awarded Cat 5 shutters the Energy Star Award Certificate for providing energy efficient products. These green products are unlike any other out there.

How to Select Approved Shutters

One way to pre-screen manufacturers and products is to check their membership in the International Hurricane Protection Association (IHPA). Manufacturer who are members of the IHPA, a not-for-profit trade association, have all submitted products for independent testing and engineering. Member manufacturers produce products that have the necessary Texas Department of Insurance, Miami-Dade and/or FBC approvals for use in Florida and Texas. This is important because buying an unapproved system means you will not be eligible for windstorm insurance annual premium discounts, and the strength or reliability of the system is unknown. It is possible to waste your investment in a protection system or on a product that may provide poor protection or is virtually worthless or will not qualify for insurance premium discounts. If you look for the IHPA logo at dealers and manufacturer’s websites this will help identify systems that are compliant with the Florida Building Code and the International Building Code.

In order to verify that shutters are approved for use in Miami-Dade or Broward counties you can visit the Miami-Dade Building Code Compliance Office website, or, for all other Florida counties visit the Florida Building Code Product Approval website.

Find the manufacturers name, then you can look up the type of shutter and select from the drop down menus or approval numbers listed for a manufacturer.

If the manufacturer’s name is not on the list, then you may be purchasing a product that is not tested or approved. If the manufacturers name comes up but there are no products listed then they could be just starting the approval process. In this case you should wait until the shutters are approved. Many times shutters are improved or modified during the testing and approval process. If you buy before the system is approved you may be getting a prototype that will differ from the final approved product.

One of the greatest risk for poor shutter performance is the installation.

CAT 5 Shutters Advantages of Stainless Steel Screen ShuttersCat 5 Shutters offers, energy savings which could mean utility and insurance discounts, top of the line hurricane protection, security, aesthetic appeal and a nearly maintenance free system. Our product is made with stainless steel screen mesh with corrosion protection. Limited lifetime warranty on the frame construction. Clear visibility through our screens. They are built to last storm after storm, year after year.

“The Super Screen System” “Toughest screen & door in world!” Maximum Security With Aesthetic Appeal! Long-term Durability! Superior (award winning) Energy Savings! Beautiful Designer Appearance! Custom Built To Almost Any Shape! Lifetime Construction Warranty! Eliminates The Need For Bars! Egress Option Is Available On All Screens! Polyester Powder Coat Finish! You Don’t Have To Sacrifice Your Safety Or Your View! Easy Installation! Approved Hurricane Shutter!

We invite you to review our hurricane shutters portfolio in Palm Beach and Monroe County .

Contact Cat 5 Shutters for a quote today.

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Are You Ready for Hurricane Shutter Installation

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 20, 2014

Are You Ready for Hurricane Shutter InstallationHurricane season is approaching fast-June 1. Setting up storm shades is extremely beneficial because they provide a physical barrier from flying debris battering the glass windows of your home. While windows are created from sturdy glass, even a small piece of wood or other debris can be picked up and flung through the air by a 100 mile per hour gust directly at your window. Such things can easily shatter even sturdy glass windows. Making use of a heavy-duty, well-designed hurricane shutter system overlaid on your windowpane is going to help soak up the brunt of the collision and reduce the damage.

Are you ready for hurricane shutter installation? Here is what you need to know.
A well-defined description of hurricane shutters is provided by Weberdesigngroup.

Hurricane shutters are available as: storm panel hurricane shutters, accordion hurricane shutters, colonial hurricane shutters, Bahama hurricane shutters, and roll – down hurricane shutters.

Storm Panel Hurricane Shutters

Storm panel hurricane shutters are the most popular hurricane shutters out of all of the shutters that are available. For homeowners that choose to install storm panel hurricane shutters, they will need to also install metal tracts that will hold the sheets of steel or corrugated aluminum in place along the window. The storm panel hurricane shutters are created in a corrugated style so that the pieces can overlap one another, creating an even stronger resistance to the hurricane-force winds. Since there are different storm pane hurricane shutters that are available for installation, it is up to the home owner on which style they would prefer.

One style of the storm panel shutters are inserted to the top tract, while the bottom of the panel is fastened to the bottom tract, which lies underneath the window. It is important to cover the entire window so that there are very little gaps, if any, that the hurricane’s winds can get into and blow the shutters off of the windows. There are two other versions of the storm panels as well: the panels that must be installed on tracts that are permanently set into the walls of the home, and the other are shutters that must be aligned with bolts, quite similar to hanging up a shower curtain. Many people like to purchase the storm panel hurricane shutters because they are the most inexpensive out of all of the shutters. They can also be disassembled once the hurricane has passed, which does not leave the shutters on the house permanently. They are also quite durable, which is what many homeowners are looking for. On the downside, storm panel shutters often have sharp and jagged edges, are cumbersome to maneuver, and some types are too heavy for only one individual to install. Although there may be more cons to pros, the storm panel hurricane shutters are the most popular out of all of the hurricane shutters available on the market.

Accordion Hurricane Shutters

Another form of hurricane shutters are accordion hurricane shutters. Just as the name would suggest, the accordion hurricane shutters open and shut just as an accordion would. They are stored on tracts that are permanently placed into a home, and fold like an accordion on either side of the windows for storage. Many home owners like the accordion hurricane style, as it can offer some of the maximum protection from a hurricane’s strong and gusty winds. Also, many home owners like to have the accordion style installed on their homes so that they do not have to worry about trying to apply hurricane shutters when there is a storm that is fast approaching. The cons of having accordion shutters are that the shutters can look aesthetically unappealing on a home, and it is set permanently. As much, accordion shutters run on wheels at the bottom of the tracts. Should any of the wheels break while in use, they can ruin the effectiveness of the shutters from an impending hurricane.

Colonial Hurricane Shutters

Colonial hurricane shutters are another form of shutter protection that can be placed on a house in the hopes of warding off severe damage to a home. These shutters are created in a horizontal, slat-like fashion, quite similar to the old colonial style of window shadings. There are two pieces that latch together in the middle of the window, thus covering the window as protection against the storm. Although colonial shutters are still in use, they are not as popular as the other shutters. They are fastened to the house permanently, which can be a huge time saver in the event of an emergency and fast preparedness is needed. Many single home owners like colonial hurricane shutters, because only one person is needed to operate and install them for use. They also come in various ornamental styles, which can appease the homeowners. However, older, and some newer, versions of the colonial hurricane shutters must be adhered together with a rod that is centrally placed on the window. This can make for a much longer time for readiness for the hurricane time that can be used for other preparations.

Bahama Hurricane Shutters

The Bahama hurricane shutters are almost exactly like the colonial hurricane shutters, except they come in one piece instead of two. They are installed as permanent fixtures on the home and come in various decorative styles. Some homeowners will not work with the Bahama hurricane shutters, as they feel that they are not effective enough as an alternate version of hurricane shutters. They are not designed to be as rugged and sturdy as the older models and their counterparts, which worries many homeowners.

Roll-Up and Down Hurricane Shutters

Roll-down hurricane shutters are perhaps the best liked of the shutter systems, although it is also the most expensive. Roll-down hurricane shutters can be engaged for window protection at the push of a button. These shutter systems are installed at the top of the windows, and there is a permanent metal receptacle that houses the shutters. Once a centralized button is pushed, the roll-down shutters will drop from their homes and cover the windows. This is the best feature of the shutters, as it is easy on those that live on their own, or who may have a difficult time installing shutters by themselves. On the other hand, the shutters can fail if there is not a battery to back up the controls, leading to unprotected windows.

Protecting one’s home is the most important goal when selecting hurricane shutters. It is important to know which ones work well with the homeowner’s budget, as well as, if they want to invest in long-term shutters. Above all, selecting shutters that will be for the betterment of one’s safety is the best purchase to make.

For professional advise and hurricane shutter installation contact Cat 5 Shutters today. Visit our website at www.cat5shutters.net

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Are we lucky?

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 15, 2014

Are we lucky?Will this be the year the USA’s luck runs out?

With the Atlantic hurricane season starting June 1, the nation is enjoying two record streaks for a lack of hurricanes: It’s been nine years since the last hit from a “major” hurricane and also nine years since a hurricane of any sort hit Florida, traditionally the most hurricane-prone state in the nation.

Both streaks began on Oct. 24, 2005, when Category 3 Hurricane Wilma slammed into southwest Florida with 120-mph winds.

A “major” hurricane is a Category 3, 4, or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Scale of Hurricane Intensity; the minimum wind speed for a major hurricane is 111 mph.

“This is the longest period on record with no major hurricane landfalls since 1878, when reliable landfall records began,” says Colorado State University meteorologist and hurricane expert Phil Klotzbach.
Despite its fury, Hurricane/Superstorm Sandy, was a Category 1 hurricane, with maximum winds of 80 mph, when it made landfall in October 2012 in New Jersey. Sandy is a good example of how wind speed can be an inadequate measure of a hurricane’s ferocity.

Sandy killed dozens of people and did $65 billion damage in the USA. alone, the National Climatic Data Center reported.

Hurricane Ike battered the Texas coast in 2008, killing at least 112 people and doing $27 billion in damage, but it missed the “major” hurricane label by 1 mph when it slammed ashore with winds of 110 mph.
One explanation for the hiatus in major hurricanes: “Luck, and it will run out,” says Dennis Feltgen, a spokesman with the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

Quiet hurricane season predicted

“Luck has certainly played a role,” agrees Klotzbach. Also, steering currents have helped guide storms out to sea, he says.
“We have tended to have a trough of low pressure along the East Coast of the U.S. during the past eight years, which has helped steer storms away from the mainland,” said Klotzbach.
Florida’s nine-year hurricane-free streak is also notable for the state that sticks out into the hurricane zone like a sore thumb: Since 1851, 114 hurricanes have hit Florida, according to data from the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. This is 39% of the total number of U.S. hurricane strikes.
“These remarkable streaks must end sometime.” noted Roger Pielke, Jr., a professor of environmental studies at the University of Colorado,
“We need to be prepared that this would be the year that both streaks end,” added Feltgen.

Hurricane season begins June 1. Klotzbach and his team at Colorado State, which includes William Gray, the dean of hurricane forecasting, are predicting a below-average season, with only three hurricanes forecast to form in the Atlantic.
AccuWeather’s forecast, released today, also predicts a below-average season, with five hurricanes.
A season with few hurricanes doesn’t mean that the ones that do form will be weak: In 1992, only four hurricanes formed, but one of them was monstrous Hurricane Andrew, which killed dozens and caused $27 billion in damages as it battered south Florida.
Federal forecasters from the Climate Prediction Center will issue their forecast on May 22.

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