Hurrican Shutters

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Posts Tagged ‘Florida Hazardous Weather…’

Low pressure system likely to become tropical depression or storm

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 30, 2014

Low pressure system likely to become tropical depression or storm1. Shower and thunderstorm activity remains minimal in association with
a low pressure area located about 140 miles east-northeast of
Melbourne, Florida. However, surface pressures are falling, and
environmental conditions are forecast to become more conducive for
development during the next few days. A tropical depression is
likely to form by mid-week while the system moves slowly
southwestward and thens turns northward and northeastward near the
southeastern United States coast. An Air Force Reserve
reconnaissance aircraft is scheduled to investigate the low this
afternoon, if necessary.

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Preparations for your Pet

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 20, 2014

Preparations for your Pet

* Have your pet micro chipped, so they can be identified if they go missing.

* Get your pets acclimated to a locking crate or carrier. Just leave it out and open so they can freely go in and out to get comfortable with it.

* Do not leave your pet behind and alone, they may find a way to get out and run away.

* Evacuations may last longer than a day so make sure to be prepared for a week or two if needed with their food and toys.

* Most public shelters do not allow pets. Make sure to find a pet friendly shelter and call ahead to be sure.

* Some hotels will slow pets for a storm, again always call ahead.

* Your vet or animal shelter may take in pets on a list prior to a storm coming, call and find out what steps you would need to do to get on that list.

* Be attentive to your pet even after a storm blows through. Streets and yards may be flooded and full of debris. Nails, wood, glass and other objects can injury your pet and yourself.

* It is easy for animal to become disorientated, and there will be lots of unusual smells and thing t o explore that may be hazardous to them. Down power lines, puddles and other things could harm them and your self, so pay attention when going for walks.

* Be aware of wild animals running loose looking for dry land or food, from raccoons to snakes to other creatures finding their way into your home.

No matter what the case may be, always be prepared. Your home your family and your pets.

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Tracking the tropics

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 18, 2014

Tracking the tropicsQuick Summary:- Currently no tropical cyclones anywhere in the world

– Weak disturbance near Florida bringing showers and thunderstorms there; not currently showing signs of tropical development
– Eastern Pacific system could eventually develop, but not doing so yet

ATLANTIC, CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO

There’s an area of showers and thunderstorms with some twist evident on satellite/radar loops over the northwest Bahamas and parts of the Florida peninsula.
A couple earlier runs of the RPM model were eye-catching, showing the system spinning like a top and heading into Florida on Thursday.
Every once in a while one of these things at this time of year will quickly turn into a tropical depression or storm, and on general principle we keep an eye on systems in such close proximity to the U.S.; however there is currently no surface circulation (the rotation is ~2-4 miles up) and surface pressures in the area are higher than what is typically conducive to tropical cyclone formation, and for now that has to be considered a long shot.
We’ll monitor and let you know if that changes; regardless, cloud-to-ground lightning and locally heavy rain will be hazards from the thunderstorms, typical of summer in Florida.
Nothing else new to report in the Atlantic, Caribbean, or Gulf.

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Florida riding a lucky streak as hurricane season 2014 opens

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on June 12, 2014

Florida riding a lucky streak as hurricane season 2014 opensThe last time a hurricane struck Florida, we were in the midst of a Shaq attack, largely oblivious to a phenom in Cleveland named LeBron becoming the youngest player to score more than 50 points in a pro basketball game. Jeb Bush was governor. And about 27,000 Miami-Dade first-graders hadn’t even been born. That may seem like ages ago in South Florida years. But in hurricane time, it’s just a lucky streak that forecasters warn could end anytime over the next six-month hurricane season, which officially opened Sunday.
“We’re very vulnerable, so it’s a matter of when, not if,” said National Hurricane Center Director Rick Knabb.
Florida, hit more times than any other state, has not had a hurricane in eight straight seasons — a desperately needed break after the worst two back-to-back years on record. But since then, there have been plenty of near misses fired from the Atlantic Basin, which experts say remains in a cycle of high activity.
In 2004, four hurricanes made landfall — Charley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne — the most recorded for the state in a single year. And 2005 was no cake walk: Three hurricanes crossed Florida that year including Katrina, on its fatal course to New Orleans, and Wilma, which slogged across the Everglades to leave a record-breaking 98 percent of South Florida in the dark and cause $20.6 billion in damage.
But since 2005, every hurricane has veered away from the peninsula — either skirting the coast like Superstorm Sandy or simply fizzling. But the state has not escaped unscathed. Enough tropical storms made landfall to ring up millions in damages.
In 2008, Tropical Storm Fay zigzagged its way to a record four landfalls in the state, causing five deaths and inflicting $560 million in damage. In 2012, Hurricane Isaac never made landfall in Florida, but its soggy tail whacked Palm Beach County, unleashing massive flooding that stranded some western residents for up to two days. Price: $71 million. That same year, Tropical Storm Debby dropped nearly 30 inches of rain on North Florida and the Panhandle, sending the Sopchoppy River over its banks and costing $250 million.
Meanwhile, the Gulf and the Caribbean got hammered.
In 2007, Noel killed 163 people in Hispaniola but then took a turn after it crossed Cuba and missed Florida. Three storms marched across the Gulf the next year: First, Dolly slammed Texas with 16 inches of rain, followed by Gustav in Louisiana and finally Ike, a massive storm that hit the entire coast from Louisiana west to Corpus Christi, Texas. Altogether, they generated more than $34 billion in damage.
In 2009, a small late-season hurricane named Ida made a beeline for Nicaragua from the Southwest Caribbean, leaving about 40,000 homeless before making landfall in Alabama and heading up the southeast coast to become a nor’easter.
During each of the next three years, 19 named storms stumbled around the North Atlantic, ricocheting off the Greater Antilles in the Caribbean. In 2010, five hurricanes hit Mexico, killing dozens and costing $7 billion.
And then there’s Sandy, the hurricane that skipped past Florida to devastate a swath of the Northeast after becoming a superstorm when it collided with a winter storm late in 2012.
Officially, this year is expected to be relatively quiet.
Forecasters say the El Niño weather pattern in the Pacific should keep the number of named storms to between eight and 13. They predict that three to six may become hurricanes and that two could grow into major storms. But, as forecasters emphasize every year, it only takes one big storm to make a bad year. And they have no bigger reminder than Sandy, which spun out of a frenzied year in which 10 hurricanes formed but only one made headlines.
“Sandy reminded us that loss of life and property during a tropical storm doesn’t necessarily come about from wind and rain. It comes from storm surge,” said National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Director Kathryn Sullivan.
Sandy proved to be a moment of reckoning for coastal states. Katrina may have shed light on the dangers of flooding, but the bowl-shaped topography of New Orleans made it seem uniquely vulnerable. In the wake of Sandy’s 72 deaths in the U.S. and $50 billion in damage, the country undertook a serious reassessment. Efforts were made to streamline emergency response and relief. And Congress agreed to spend $476 million on improved forecasting tools, including storm surge maps the hurricane center will roll out this year from its storm-proof bunker on Florida International University’s campus.
The maps, in real-time and interactive, will go up on the center’s website (www.nhc.noaa.gov) about an hour after it issues warnings and watches. That’s about 48 hours before winds are expected to make landfall, said Jamie Rhome, who heads the center’s storm surge unit. The information will be updated every six hours and show where water may go and how high it might rise. Designers worked hard to make them user-friendly, said Rhome, who compared their operation with Google maps.
“It will have a local feel, but you won’t be able to zoom in and out of a specific home,” he said.
The information has been available in text form for years, he said. But until recently, forecasters didn’t have the computer power needed to model so much information. The maps have to accommodate not only the contours of the coastline — both above ground and under water — but the intensity of a storm, where it lands, how fast it is moving, the angle it approaches and the timing of tides.
Max Mayfield, a former director of the hurricane center and hurricane specialist with WPLG-ABC 10, said the maps, which he began asking for when he was director between 2000 and 2007, are long overdue.
“Most people evacuate because of the wind, but by far the vast majority of people — in fact, 88 percent — die from water,” he said.
When Sandy made landfall in October 2012 on the south shore of New Jersey, its tropical storm-force winds extended about 1,000 miles. Water rose along the entire East Coast, from Florida to Maine, NOAA later reported. Tide gauges at the Battery in Manhattan and on Staten Island recorded water levels about nine feet above the lowest-lying spots on the shoreline. At Sandy Hook in New Jersey, a gauge measured eight feet before it failed.
NOAA repeatedly issued warnings about the surge. Gary Szatkowski, a meteorologist stationed at a weather station in Mount Holly, New Jersey, where 24 people died, even included his contact information to personally persuade anyone with doubts.
“Think of the rescue/recovery teams who will rescue you if you are injured or recover your remains if you do not survive,” he wrote. “If you think the storm is overhyped and exaggerated, please err on the side of caution. You can call me up Friday (contact information is at the end of this briefing) and yell at me all you want.”
Yet a NOAA survey taken afterward found that 79 percent of residents along the coast where warnings were issued said they were caught off-guard by the size of the surge. And that weighed heavily on forecasters in the two years since, Rhome said.
“I’ve heard the word accelerate more times than I can count,” he said, referring to the pressure to produce the maps.
The best use of the maps, forecasters say, is for planning. They’ll allow people to not only determine in advance whether they might need to evacuate, but track an escape route in case they wait.
“The only thing it doesn’t tell you is the timing of when that water is going to get there, and sometimes escape routes get cut off,” said Jeff Masters, director of meteorology at the popular website Weather Underground. “So you have to be aware of timing issues.”
The modeling for the maps is so far conservative, with the chance of storm surge exceeding the amount indicated only one in 10, Rhome explained. Masters and others hope the center can improve accuracy.
“It’s a reasonable worst-case scenario. It’s not an explicit forecast because nobody can predict exactly how much surge there is going to be in a given spot,” Rhome said.
The center plans to test and tinker with the maps this year and next before finalizing them. The center also plans to start issuing surge watches and warnings in 2015 to accompany wind warnings.
“Warnings have always been a call to action. They are our most formal and direct way of communicating,” Rhome said. “The analogy here is if you’re standing in the road, I might tell you standing in the road is dangerous. That’s the graphic. The warning is telling you if you don’t get out of the road, you’re going to get hit by a car.”

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2014/05/31/4150051/florida-riding-a-lucky-streak.html#storylink=cpy

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Do you need flood insurance?

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 20, 2014

Do you need flood insurance?Flood insurance is mandatory if: your property resides in a Special Flood Hazard Areayou have a federally backed mortgage on a home in a high risk areayou have received a federal grant for previous flood losses and you wish to qualify for future aid.

A flood policy can cover:
flood debris cleanupstructural damage (walls, ceilings, floors, stairways, etc.)
household appliances/utilities damaged by floodwaterwall to wall carpeting, tile and other flooring surfaces

Contents coverage can cover:
furniture,collectibles, artwork, knick-knacks,clothing, shoes, accessories, jewelry, etc.Added coverages may be available for dislocation expenses such as rent, hotel stays, meals, etc.

The maximum coverage limits under a standard flood policy are $250,000 for a single family home structure ($500,000 for businesses) and $100,000 for single-family home contents (500,000 for businesses). The coverage limit for renter contents is $100,000.
Property owners living in lower risk areas may qualify for a “preferred risk” policy which provides the same coverage’s at substantially lower rates.

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Hurricane Shutters FAQ

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 13, 2014

Hurricane Shutters FAQWhen it comes to Hurricane Shutters you need to know that they will indeed stand up to, well, a hurricane. Your Hurricane Shutters will be that first line of defense that keeps your windows, and the inside of your home, intact. To make sure that Hurricane Shutters will indeed stand up to their name the State of Florida requires independent testing and review by a Florida licensed professional engineer. Once they have verified that the shutters will indeed withstand a hurricane the product is approved.

Q: Should I tape my windows when a hurricane threatens?

A: NO! It is a waste of effort, time, and tape. It offers little strength to the glass and NO protection against flying debris. After the storm passes you will spend many a hot summer afternoon trying to scrape the old, baked-on tape off your windows (assuming they weren’t shattered). Once a Hurricane Warning has been issued you would be better off spending your time putting up shutters over doors and windows.

Q: Should I put shutters over my doors ???

A: Obviously sliding glass doors, french doors or any door with considerable glass in it should be protected. Some double doors or garage doors should either be shuttered or reinforced. In Hurricane Andrew many of these type doors gave way.

Q: Why should I get hurricane shutters ?

A: People who live in coastal counties from Texas to Maine, and those in other hurricane prone areas, such as most of the Florida peninsula, will find shutters an excellent investment for protecting their lives and property. They protect against wind and wind-borne debris. These shutters protect not only the windows or doors they cover, but also possessions and people inside the building. Once a window or door has been breeched by hurricane winds tremendous pressure is brought to bear on interior walls and upward pressure on the building’s roof. This can lead to roof failure which exposes the entire contents of the building to the storm. Shutters are a first line of defense against the hurricane. Much of the damage and building failure in Hurricane Andrew could have been prevented by well installed hurricane shutters over windows and doors.

Q: Why should I bother with shutters if I live in an evacuation zone?

A: Shutters will protect your house and possessions from wind damage whether you are there or not. If the storm surge should reach your home then the shutters won’t protect against the flood of water. But not every place in the evacuation zone will flood. You should take every reasonable precaution to protect your property.

Q: What are the best kind of shutters ?

A: The best kind are those that are affordable, are easy to install, and offer the greatest protection. Which of these properties is most important to you depends on individual circumstances. For a disabled or elderly person it may be ease of installation with either an automatic closing mechanism or accordion type shutters. For those with limited incomes plywood shutters may be the only affordable option. For most people the best compromise would be steel panels, which offer good protection, but are expensive and take effort to install. Aluminum panels are lighter and easier to install, but offer less protection and may not meet the building code for your area.
Which ever type you decide on it is important to remember that shutters are only as good as the quality of their installation. Ensure that the shutters or their anchors are installed by qualified workmen and that quality materials that meet the building code for your area are used.

Q: What about the plastic film and shatter resistant windows I’ve heard about ?

A: Although these are remarkable products that are being improved every year, they are no substitute for shutters. If you have windows that for some reason, such as access, can’t be shuttered then you may wish to consider using the film or installing the shatter resistant glass.
Remember that the film only protects the glass. The frame is still under pressure and the whole window could fail. Windows with these treatments will still suffer damage from the impact of debris and may have to be replaced after a storm, whereas a shutter would take most or all of the energy of such an impact. Films and special glasses also might not meet the building code for your area.

Q: How do I choose an installation company I can trust ?

A: The same way you go about choosing any company that performs a service. Make sure they are licensed, get references, and then check the references. Ask your neighbors and friends about who installed their shutters and if they had any complaints or recommendations. Check out a company with the Better Business Bureau, your local licensing authority, or contractor association.

Q: When is the best time to get my shutters installed ?
 
A: The best time to have shutters installed is when the house is built so they can be a part of the design. If you own a house without shutters have them installed as soon as is practical. Keep in mind that the beginning of hurricane season may be a busy time for most installation companies. Do NOT wait until a Hurricane Watch is issued for your area.
At the start of each hurricane season you should test out your shutters. For permanently installed shutters try closing each one to make sure they work smoothly and lock tight. For panels and plywood shutters try a couple of windows and doors to ensure the hardware works and check the time you need to complete the job. Check all panels for warpage or other damage which could compromise its integrity. Repair any problems at this time so that everything is ready when a storm threatens.

When a Hurricane Watch is issued for your area check all mechanisms and hardware again, and maybe pre-install the more difficult shutters. If you live in an evacuation zone and it will take 2 or 3 hours to complete your shutter installation, you may want to start during the Watch phase. If you are not in an evacuation zone you should time your installation early in the Warning phase so that you are not struggling with panels during high winds.

Q: What if I can’t afford commercial shutters ?

A: The least expensive, effective method of protecting windows is probably using plywood. The key to plywood shutters is thickness and installation. Use at least 5/8 inch exterior grade plywood, it makes the shutters heavier but safer. They should be cut to fit inside the window frame, installed prior to hurricane season, marked for which window they are made for, and stored with their hardware, preferably in a dry location. Heat and moisture over time will warp plywood, and a good fit is essential to their effectiveness.

If even these shutters seem too expensive consider making them for two or three windows at a time, starting with the most vulnerable. After a few years you will have your whole house ready.

Q: Can condominium associations prohibit shutters ?

A: The short answer in Florida is NO. Chapter 718 of Florida Statutes of the Comdominium Act (1991) permits each board of administration to adopt specifications as to color, style, etc., but all specifications “shall comply with the applicable building code”. The Florida statutes further state “… a board shall not refuse to approve the installation or replacement of hurricane shutters conforming to the specifications adopted by the board.”

No matter what hurricane needs you have contact CAT 5 Shutters, LLC for a free estimate.

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WHEN THE STORM THREATENS

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on May 1, 2014

WHEN THE STORM THREATENSWHEN THE STORM THREATENS:
 
Refill special medications.
Get cash (ATMs may not work for days after).
 Don’t charge credit cards to the limit; you might need extra cash after the storm.
Get supplies.
Don’t fill gasoline cans until right before the storm; they are a fire hazard.
Fill vehicle fuel tank.
Gas stations will run out and some will not have power to run pumps.
Check your car’s battery, water, oil.
Make sure you have a spare tire and buy aerosol kits that fix and inflate flats.
Check fire extinguishers.
If you own a boat, make necessary preparations.
Prepare your pool. Don’t drain it.
If you own a plane, have it flown out or secured.

WHEN THE STORM IS APPROACHING: Get shutters, storm panels or plywood in place on windows. If you haven’t installed sockets, attach with wood screws; they’re better than nails and do less damage. Don’t tape windows; tape can create daggers of glass and bake onto panes. Remove swings and tarps from swing sets. Tie down anything you can’t bring in. Check for loose rain gutters, moldings. Move grills, patio furniture and potted plants into your house or garage. If you do any last-minute pruning, take clippings inside so they don’t become missiles. Disconnect and remove satellite dish or antenna from your roof. Check your mailbox. If it’s loose, secure or remove it. Remove roof turbines and cap holes with screw-on caps. Unsecured turbines can fly off and create a large hole for rain to pour through. Prepare patio screening. It usually is built to sustain tropical-force winds, but as it fills with wind, it can separate from the frame. Officials recommend you remove a 6-foot panel on each side to let wind pass through. Pull out the tubing that holds screening in frame to remove screen. Secure and brace external doors, especially the garage door and double doors. Move vehicles out of flood-prone areas and into garages if possible. If not, park cars away from trees and close to homes or buildings. Don’t turn off your natural gas at the main meter. Only emergency or utility people should do that. –

If you don’t have hurricane protection contact CAT 5 Shutters LLC toll free at 1-877-CAT-FIE or visit us on the web at www.cat5shutters.net. Don’t wait until a storm is approaching to get shutters it may be to late.

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Another Quality Job by CAT 5 Shutters, LLC

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on April 25, 2014

Another Quality Job by CAT 5 Shutters, LLC

Here is another quality job done by CAT 5 Shutters, LLC

Located on the water in Boca Raton, Florida

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Hurricane Preparedness

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on April 23, 2014

Hurricane PreparednessKnow the Difference Hurricane Watch
Hurricane conditions are a threat within 48 hours. Review your hurricane plans. Get ready to act if a warning is issued, and stay informed.

Hurricane Warning
Hurricane conditions are expected within 36 hours. Complete your storm preparations and leave the area if directed to do so by authorities.

Landslides have occurred in almost every state and can cause significant damage. The term landslide describes downhill earth movements that can move slowly and cause damage gradually, or move rapidly, destroying property and taking lives suddenly and unexpectedly. Most landslides are caused by natural forces or events, such as heavy rain and snowmelt, shaking due to earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and gravity. Landslides are typically associated with periods of heavy rainfall or rapid snowmelt and tend to worsen the effects of flooding. Areas burned by forest and brush fires are also particularly susceptible to landslides. Landslides generally happen in areas where they have occurred in the past. Learn about your area’s landslide risk. Landslides can also be referred to as mudslides, debris flows, mudflows or debris avalanches.Debris flows and other landslides onto roadways are common during rainstorms.Heavily saturated ground is very susceptible to mudflows and debris flows.Be aware that, generally, landslide insurance is not available, but that debris flow damage may be covered by flood insurance policies from the National Flood Insurance.

Our pets enrich our lives in more ways than we can count. They are members of the family. In turn, they depend on us for their safety and wellbeing. The best way to ensure the safety of your entire family is to be prepared with a disaster plan. If you are a pet owner, that plan includes your pets. Being prepared can help save lives. Emergency action plans for your family should include your animals

Coping with Power Outages Sudden power outages can be frustrating and troublesome, especially when they last a long time. If a power outage is 2 hours or less, don’t be concerned about losing your perishable foods. For prolonged power outages, though, there are steps you can take to minimize food loss and to keep all members of your household as comfortable as possible.

Energy Conservation Recommendations Turn off lights and computers when not in use.Wash clothes in cold water if possible; wash only full loads and clean the dryer’s lint trap after each use.When using a dishwasher, wash full loads and use the light cycle. If possible, use the rinse only cycle and turn off the high temperature rinse option. When the regular wash cycle is done, just open the dishwasher door to allow the dishes to air dry.Replace incandescent light bulbs with energy efficient compact fluorescent lights.

Make Water Safety Your Priority Swim in designated areas supervised by lifeguards.Always swim with a buddy; do not allow anyone to swim alone. Even at a public pool or a lifeguarded beach, use the buddy system!Ensure that everyone in the family learns to swim well. Enroll in age-appropriate Red Cross water orientation and Learn-to-Swim courses.Never leave a young child unattended near water and do not trust a child’s life to another child; teach children to always ask permission to go near water.Have young children or inexperienced swimmers wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets around water, but do not rely on life jackets alone.Establish rules for your family and enforce them without fail. For example, set limits based on each person’s ability, do not let anyone play around drains and suction fittings, and do not allow swimmers to hyperventilate before swimming under water or have breath-holding contests.Even if you do not plan on swimming, be cautious around natural bodies of water including ocean shoreline, rivers and lakes. Cold temperatures, currents and underwater hazards can make a fall into these bodies of water dangerous.If you go boating, wear a life jacket! Most boating fatalities occur from drowning.Avoid alcohol use. Alcohol impairs judgment, balance and coordination; affects swimming and diving skills; and reduces the body’s ability to stay warm.

For all your shutter needs call us at CAT 5 Shutters. We offer free estimates. We also do service on hurricane protection. Once your family is prepared make sure your home is well. Contact us toll free at 1-877-CAT-FIVE or visit us on the web at www.cat5shutters.net

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El Nino Climate Changes

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on March 27, 2014

El Nino Climate ChangesA new report from NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center suggests changes could be on the way for weather patterns across the U.S. and the globe.

According to the report, the chance of an El Niño reemerging this year has increased. And, if the models from the report play out, that could mean fewer named storms in the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season and potential drought relief for parts of California later this year.

An El Niño cycle can occur every two to seven years, when weaker trade winds allow warmer water around the equator in the far eastern Pacific Ocean to emerge. That warmer water changes wind patterns and alters storm cycles around the globe.

In general, the eastern tropical Pacific ocean cycles between three phases: El Niño (warmer than average sea-surface temperatures), La Niña (cooler than average sea-surface temperatures) and a neutral phase in which sea-surface temperatures are generally near long-term averages.

Since spring 2012, the eastern Pacific ocean has been in the neutral phase, but according to the latest NOAA/CPC report, there’s now a 50 percent chance that equatorial waters in the Pacific will warm sufficiently to meet the criteria for an El Niño. As a result, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center has issued an El Niño Watch for summer 2014.
(MORE: NOAA: January 2014 Was 4th Warmest on Record)

Mike Halpert, deputy director of the Climate Prediction Center, explains, “A watch simply means that conditions across the tropical Pacific are favorable for the development of El Niño during the next, roughly, three to six months.”
He noted that a watch doesn’t guarantee an El Niño will occur, but the models are leaning that way.

A plot of the model data listed in the report shows a marked warming trend in tropical Pacific waters by mid-summer. The average of all the models suggests a 0.5ºC temperature anomaly is probable around August.
According to Halpert, that would place this El Niño event on the weak end of the Climate Prediction Center’s spectrum.If El Niño Develops, It Might be Good News..
Researchers have found that instances of Atlantic tropical storms and hurricanes are usually reduced during an El Niño year. Based on the current model data, it appears that El Niño could develop near the height of the Atlantic hurricane season — potentially inhibiting some tropical development.
But Halpert said even with El Niño, strong tropical cyclones are still possible. “I always like to remind people of the 1992 hurricane season, which was an El Niño year and only featured seven named storms. But the first one was Andrew.”
Also, despite development of a weak El Niño, Hurricanes Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne raked parts of Florida during the 2004 Atlantic hurricane season.
If El Niño develops, beneficial rains could bring much-needed relief to some drought-stricken areas, most notably California.

If you need Hurricane protection contact CAT 5 Shutters, LLC. Call us toll free at 1-877-CAT-FIVE or visit us on the web at www.cat5shutters.net

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