Hurrican Shutters

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Archive for January, 2014

Hurricane Center to issue storm surge maps this year

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on January 31, 2014

Hurricane Center to issue storm surge maps this yearAs promised, the National Hurricane Center will start using an experimental potential storm surge flooding map this season. Surge, not rain-driven flooding or high winds, often is the biggest killer in a hurricane. The problem’s far more severe in the Miami area, where Hurricane Andrew deposited sailboats in trees and freighters on top of flood gates, and especially in southwest Florida, where the sloping landscape provides the potential for standing water dozens of miles inland.
 It’s not as dramatic a factor in Palm Beach County and the Treasure Coast, because the ocean floor drops off precipitously just off the coast and the deep water absorbs much of the energy of a storm surge. The region also benefits from several ridges. But the damage is less, not zero.
 A June study said three Palm Beach County  remain in the top 10 in South Florida in terms of potential storm surge loss because of the combination of surge and high property values. Scientists have said even in a minimal storm, water would cover most or all of barrier islands and the mainland right along the Intracoastal Waterway, and in a Category 5 storm, the ocean could rise up to 10 feet above normal in coastal Palm Beach County and up to 15 feet on the Treasure Coast. Hurricane Center director Rick Knabb said at last year’s Florida Hurricane Conference in Fort Lauderdale that his operation would begin displaying experimental graphics showing potential storm surge and start implementing storm surge watches and warnings as early as 2015.
 Watches would have their own point A and point B, independent of whatever evacuation borders counties have set. The hurricane center said Friday in a release that the maps issued this year will show where storm surge could occur and how high above ground the water could reach in those areas.

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Roll-Down/Up Hurricane Shutters by CAT 5 Shutters, LLC

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on January 30, 2014

Roll-Down/Up Hurricane Shutters by CAT 5 Shutters, LLCThese hurricane shutters attach above the window. They roll up and down, stored in an enclosed box when not in use. They are lowered either manually by a hand crank or automatically by push button, and lock in place for storm protection.

Rolling shutters provide an attractive, sophisticated appearance. You no longer have to operate with a “boarded up” look where customer’s can’t tell whether you are home or not or your business is open or closed. In addition rolling shutters are used on yachts to protect equipment during time at sea!

Rolling Shutters protect windows, sliding doors to greatly minimize the intrusion of water through the door caused by rain driven by storm-force winds.

Open Roll Down / Up Hurricane Shutters
Available in White, Ivory Beige and Bronze. Average storm preparation time: Minimal; probably the easiest hurricane shutter to operate.

Pros

Are permanently affixed above the windows
Don’t require any extra storage space
Can easily be made storm-ready by one person
Offers some of the best hurricane protection
Also make an excellent theft deterrent
Reduces your Air Conditioning costs
Lowers noise by up to 70%

Cons

Most expensive of the popular shutter systems
Push-button-operated roll / up-down hurricane shutters require a battery backup system so the shutters can be lowered and raised during power outages.

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Wintery storms hit the south

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on January 29, 2014

Wintery storms hit the southKids slept in schools in Georgia and Alabama. People forced to ditch their vehicles in metro Atlanta spent the night inside grocery stores, home improvement stores and even pharmacies. Ice-slicked interstates remain closed from Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle.

“We may go above freezing for a few hours this afternoon in some of these locations, but we go right back down tonight,” said Tom Niziol, winter weather expert for The Weather Channel. “Things are going to freeze right back up and it’s going to be another day before we can open up these roadways in many of the metro locations in the Southeast.”

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Hurricane 2014

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on January 27, 2014

Hurricane 2014

TSR predicts Atlantic hurricane activity in 2014 will be close to the long-term average. However, the uncertainties at this extended range are large. The precision of TSR’s December outlooks for upcoming Atlantic hurricane activity between 1980 and 2013 is low

The TSR (Tropical Storm Risk) extended range forecast for Atlantic hurricane activity in 2014 anticipates near-norm activity. Based on current and projected climate signals, Atlantic basin tropical cyclone activity is forecast to be close to the 1950-2013 long-term norm but about 20% below the recent 2004-2013 10-year norm. The forecast spans the period from 1st June to 30th November 2014 and employs data through to the end of November 2013. TSR’s two predictors are the forecast July-September trade wind speed over the Caribbean and tropical North Atlantic, and the forecast August-September 2014 sea surface temperatures in the tropical North Atlantic. The former influences cyclonic vorticity (the spinning up of storms) in the main hurricane track region, while the latter provides heat and moisture to power incipient storms in the main track region. At present TSR anticipates the SST predictor to have a small enhancing effect on activity and the trade wind predictor to have a small suppressing effect on activity.

So get your hurricane protection soon. Contact CAT 5 Shutters at 561-333-2285 or visit us on the web at www.cat5shutters.net

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Hurricane Damages

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on January 24, 2014

Hurricane DamagesHurricane Season in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico is from June 1 to November 30. During hurricane season it’s important to stay alert for hurricane updates and storm forecasts. Hurricanes can change direction suddenly so it’s important to stay tuned to local weather reports from the National Hurricane Center.

If you own a home in the South Florida area, you should seriously consider protection from a natural disaster with hurricane shutters or impact resistant windows. Don’t Wait to Hire a Hurricane Shutter Contractor.

Below we offer a list of the most common hurricane damages outlined by Hurricane Insurance.

Broken Windows:
Windows are particularly susceptible to hurricanes both because of the wind itself and the debris the wind carries. Once windows are broken, your home could become much weaker and less resistant, sustaining even greater damage.

Roof Lifting:
When the intense winds from a hurricane strike a house, one of the first things to be hit hardest is the roof. Roofs with a low slope act similarly to a airplane wing, with strong winds actually lifting the roof from the house. If your roof goes, along with the joists that hold the tops of the walls together, your house could be done for.

Basement Flooding:
If your home has a basement or crawlspace, it can flood when the soil surrounding your home becomes too saturated with water, damaging any items you have stored there and making a mess of your foundation.

Blown in Garage Door:
Garage doors, because of their large size, can often fall victim to high winds. Once the garage blows in, winds will be able to enter your home, allowing wind pressure to fill the house and possibly blow it down from the pressure inside.

Moisture Damage:
Heavy rains and rising waters, if they do get into your home, can cause more than immediate damage. Mold can develop from moisture that gets into insulation and wood. Newer homes can benefit from mold resistant materials, but owners of older homes need to take action ensure that moisture never gets inside in the first place.

Damage from Landscaping:
If you live in a hurricane prone area, you’ll want to carefully consider your landscaping options and use trees and bushes that are more resistant to storm winds. Small gravel, weak tree branches, and other easily lifted things around your yard should be taken care of before hurricane season.

Destroyed Doors:
Your doors, like windows, are important part of keeping out the winds and rains that can damage the interior of your home and its contents. Doors that aren’t sturdy or properly secured are often blown open or even off their hinges, becoming a danger to you as well as the structure of your home.

Damage from Projectiles:
Chances are good that if you live in the tropical or near tropical areas that are particularly hurricane prone you have loads of stuff sitting outside for enjoying the weather. But BBQ grills, patio furniture, lawn ornaments, air conditioners and pool equipment can become deadly and damaging if left out in the high winds.

Lost Shingles and Roofing:
During a hurricane, your roof will be under constant force from the wind, and few roofing materials can withstand this kind of assault without sustaining some sort of damage. Newer shingles are designed to resist damage from impact and high winds, but if you can’t afford a whole new roof, you can make sure the one you have is properly secured.

Loss or Destruction of Personal Items:
While there may be no way around losing your personal belongings in a powerful storm, you can do your best to protect them. Raise your items off the floor to keep them from flood waters, especially if they’re stored in a basement.

Ruined In-Ground Pool:
Since pools are usually outside, they get the full force of what any hurricane has.

Blown Off Siding:
If you have a home with aluminum siding, you’ll want to do your best to protect it from the hurricane winds that are sure to give it a run for its money.

Missing Roof Turbines:
If you live in a house with turbines on the roof, it’s not likely that they’ll survive a storm with strong winds. This might not be a problem, except that once the turbines blow away, your roof is left with a hole in it, which can allow harmful amounts of water to enter your home.

Collapsed End Gables:
During a hurricane, the side walls of your roof, also known as end gables, will be taking quite a beating from the wind and rain, and if not properly reinforced, can actually collapse. Many homes will already have properly braced gables, but if yours does not, you can give them a hand by placing two 2x4s in an X pattern on both ends of the attic. If you don’t know much about construction, it will be best to have a professional contractor do this work for you.

Knocked Down Outbuildings, Carports and Porches:
Less sturdy buildings on your property will be hit hard by a hurricane and the ensuing winds. These structures can become airborne and potentially very dangerous if they’re knocked down during a storm. Reinforce these structures whenever possible and make sure porches are securely attached to your home.

Spoiled Food:
Because power frequently goes out during large storms and often doesn’t come back on for days, food can become spoiled quickly, especially in a warm environment. You can help save some of your food by turning your refrigerator and freezer to the coolest settings in the days before the storm.

Ruined Appliances:
Your appliances can be subject to a number of threats during a hurricane. Water damage may not always be avoidable with heavy appliances, but you should give your air conditioner and other appliances a lift. You should also unplug any major appliances once a storm hits. This will prevent shorting out if water comes in as well as destruction of electronic components if there is a surge when the power returns.

Fire Damage:
Water and electricity don’t mix, and shorts caused by downed wires or water entering outlets and electrical equipment can cause fires even in the dampest of environments. Wind can spread these fires quickly, compounding the problem. You can help avoid fires by unplugging all electronic devices in your home. If you are building a new home or revamping an old one, make sure that all electrical outlets and main electric components of your home are at least a foot above the floor.

Leaky Septic Tanks:
Flooding and ground saturation can often cause septic tanks to have trouble functioning, and power outages will disable any electric powered pumps on a tank, causing sewage backup into your home. There is really no way to avoid the ground saturation caused by flooding, but you can help reduce it by placing your septic tank in a well drained area. Providing backup electricity from a generator can also help after the storm if power is out for long periods.

Lost or Damaged Boats:
For many people living near the coastline, protecting a boat is an important part of hurricane preparation. Boats stored on land are much more likely to weather a storm successfully than those stored on the water. If you have to leave your boat in the water, secure it in a snug harbor, away from rocks and other damaging elements, with as many ties as possible keeping it in place.

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Hurricane Shutters

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on January 24, 2014

Hurricane ShuttersIf you live in a hurricane-prone area like any of the coastal counties from Texas to Maine, covers for windows are an excellent investment for protection of life and property. These covers can be heavy duty commercial shutters or properly installed plywood of sufficient thickness for the opening it is protecting. A minimum thickness suggested is 5/8-inch with thicker, properly reinforced plywood for large areas such as sliding glass doors. These covers will protect windows and doors from wind and, more importantly, flying debris.

Much of the damage that occurred from Hurricane Andrew in Miami, Fla., in 1992 resulted from failure of windows and doors. These failures frequently lead to interior wall failure and sometimes roof failures. Much of the damage from hurricane Andrew would have been prevented by shutters or other well installed covers for the windows and doors.

What is the best kind of shutter?

The best are those that are affordable and that you can manage to install or operate. For a disabled or elderly person, this may require some sort of automated method for closing; suggesting something like accordion shutters. For the strong handyman, heavy plywood trimmed to fit within the windows with secure mounting brackets makes sense. Bahamas shutters are a favorite for some because they serve a useful purpose year-round and are quick and easy to install when needed.

Storm panels are a good compromise for many people. Steel panels offer the best protection, but are difficult to install because of their weight. Aluminum panels at a comparable price offer less protection, but are easier to install. If there is no source of heavy debris upwind, you might consider the lesser protection of aluminum shutters adequate. There are other types. The key in all of these is that the installation must be good, and done by a qualified and reliable workman, and they must suit the conditions under which they will be installed and expected to perform.

Which shutter choice is best for you depends on how much work you can do in fabricating and installing them. One word of caution: if electric power is used to open or close shutters, then a mechanical backup is mandatory, since electricity may very well be out either before or after a hurricane.

What about plastic films?

Plastic films are no substitute for shutters or plywood covers for windows and doors. However, demonstrations of their strength are quite impressive, and they are probably the next best thing to solid covers for windows and doors, especially where access to such glass areas is physically restricted. One problem is that they provide only a small measure of protection for the glass itself, and frequently the frame holding the glass in place can fail. This includes both windows and sliding glass doors.

How do I choose a company I can trust?

The same way one goes about choosing any company that performs services. Make sure they are licensed and above all, check their references. If the company provides the references, they will likely not give you names of unsatisfied customers; thus referrals from friends and relatives are preferable. Also, check with the Better Business Bureau, your local licensing authority, and contractor associations.

When is the best time to get shutters installed?

The best time to have shutters installed is when your house is built so that they can be part of the design. If you already have a home without shutters, then get them installed as soon as it is practical to do so. If they are permanently in place on your home, — such as Bahamas shutters, roll-down, accordion, etc. — then practice closing them once a year before hurricane season to make sure everything is in place and in working order.

If they are panels, then check at the beginning of each hurricane season to see that all hardware is available and check each opening to make sure no repairs are required. It is also a good idea to practice installing these panels for a couple of windows or doors prior to each season, to time how long it takes you to install them.

When a hurricane watch is issued, check all mechanisms and hardware again, and perhaps install some of your more difficult shutters. If you are in a potential evacuation zone, and it is going to take you more than 2 to 3 hours to install your shutters, you may want to start the work during the hurricane watch phase. If you are not in an evacuation zone, you should have time during the hurricane warning phase to install your shutters.

What if I can’t afford to get shutters?

The least expensive effective method of protecting windows is probably plywood. If plywood covers are properly installed, they are just as effective, or maybe more effective than commercial shutters. The key is proper thickness and installation. They should be cut, fit, and installed prior to the hurricane season, and then well-marked and stored with hardware for quick installation should a hurricane threaten your area. The time for installation is the same as for shutters mentioned above. You might consider doing a few windows at a time over a long period, or seeking financing to make them affordable. There will still be some people who, for one reason or another, just can’t afford to do either of these. For those, it is like not having insurance, recovering from the disaster will be slow, and they will have to depend on outside help. Putting tape on the windows is not considered worth the effort.

Source: The Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

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Types of Huriccane Damage- Are you prepared?

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on January 22, 2014

Types of Huriccane Damage- Are you prepared?Hurricane Season in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico is from June 1 to November 30. During hurricane season it’s important to stay alert for hurricane updates and storm forecasts. Hurricanes can change direction suddenly so it’s important to stay tuned to local weather reports from the National Hurricane Center.

If you own a home in the South Florida area, you should seriously consider protection from a natural disaster with hurricane shutters or impact resistant windows. Don’t Wait to Hire a Hurricane Shutter Contractor.

Below we offer a list of the most common hurricane damages outlined by Hurricane Insurance.

Broken Windows:
Windows are particularly susceptible to hurricanes both because of the wind itself and the debris the wind carries. Once windows are broken, your home could become much weaker and less resistant, sustaining even greater damage.

Roof Lifting:
When the intense winds from a hurricane strike a house, one of the first things to be hit hardest is the roof. Roofs with a low slope act similarly to a airplane wing, with strong winds actually lifting the roof from the house. If your roof goes, along with the joists that hold the tops of the walls together, your house could be done for.

Basement Flooding:
If your home has a basement or crawlspace, it can flood when the soil surrounding your home becomes too saturated with water, damaging any items you have stored there and making a mess of your foundation.

Blown in Garage Door:
Garage doors, because of their large size, can often fall victim to high winds. Once the garage blows in, winds will be able to enter your home, allowing wind pressure to fill the house and possibly blow it down from the pressure inside.

Moisture Damage:
Heavy rains and rising waters, if they do get into your home, can cause more than immediate damage. Mold can develop from moisture that gets into insulation and wood. Newer homes can benefit from mold resistant materials, but owners of older homes need to take action ensure that moisture never gets inside in the first place.

Damage from Landscaping:
If you live in a hurricane prone area, you’ll want to carefully consider your landscaping options and use trees and bushes that are more resistant to storm winds. Small gravel, weak tree branches, and other easily lifted things around your yard should be taken care of before hurricane season.

Destroyed Doors:
Your doors, like windows, are important part of keeping out the winds and rains that can damage the interior of your home and its contents. Doors that aren’t sturdy or properly secured are often blown open or even off their hinges, becoming a danger to you as well as the structure of your home.

Damage from Projectiles:
Chances are good that if you live in the tropical or near tropical areas that are particularly hurricane prone you have loads of stuff sitting outside for enjoying the weather. But BBQ grills, patio furniture, lawn ornaments, air conditioners and pool equipment can become deadly and damaging if left out in the high winds.

Lost Shingles and Roofing:
During a hurricane, your roof will be under constant force from the wind, and few roofing materials can withstand this kind of assault without sustaining some sort of damage. Newer shingles are designed to resist damage from impact and high winds, but if you can’t afford a whole new roof, you can make sure the one you have is properly secured.

Loss or Destruction of Personal Items:
While there may be no way around losing your personal belongings in a powerful storm, you can do your best to protect them. Raise your items off the floor to keep them from flood waters, especially if they’re stored in a basement.

Ruined In-Ground Pool:
Since pools are usually outside, they get the full force of what any hurricane has.

Blown Off Siding:
If you have a home with aluminum siding, you’ll want to do your best to protect it from the hurricane winds that are sure to give it a run for its money.

Missing Roof Turbines:
If you live in a house with turbines on the roof, it’s not likely that they’ll survive a storm with strong winds. This might not be a problem, except that once the turbines blow away, your roof is left with a hole in it, which can allow harmful amounts of water to enter your home.

Collapsed End Gables:
During a hurricane, the side walls of your roof, also known as end gables, will be taking quite a beating from the wind and rain, and if not properly reinforced, can actually collapse. Many homes will already have properly braced gables, but if yours does not, you can give them a hand by placing two 2x4s in an X pattern on both ends of the attic. If you don’t know much about construction, it will be best to have a professional contractor do this work for you.

Knocked Down Outbuildings, Carports and Porches:
Less sturdy buildings on your property will be hit hard by a hurricane and the ensuing winds. These structures can become airborne and potentially very dangerous if they’re knocked down during a storm. Reinforce these structures whenever possible and make sure porches are securely attached to your home.

Spoiled Food:
Because power frequently goes out during large storms and often doesn’t come back on for days, food can become spoiled quickly, especially in a warm environment. You can help save some of your food by turning your refrigerator and freezer to the coolest settings in the days before the storm.

Ruined Appliances:
Your appliances can be subject to a number of threats during a hurricane. Water damage may not always be avoidable with heavy appliances, but you should give your air conditioner and other appliances a lift. You should also unplug any major appliances once a storm hits. This will prevent shorting out if water comes in as well as destruction of electronic components if there is a surge when the power returns.

Fire Damage:
Water and electricity don’t mix, and shorts caused by downed wires or water entering outlets and electrical equipment can cause fires even in the dampest of environments. Wind can spread these fires quickly, compounding the problem. You can help avoid fires by unplugging all electronic devices in your home. If you are building a new home or revamping an old one, make sure that all electrical outlets and main electric components of your home are at least a foot above the floor.

Leaky Septic Tanks:
Flooding and ground saturation can often cause septic tanks to have trouble functioning, and power outages will disable any electric powered pumps on a tank, causing sewage backup into your home. There is really no way to avoid the ground saturation caused by flooding, but you can help reduce it by placing your septic tank in a well drained area. Providing backup electricity from a generator can also help after the storm if power is out for long periods.

Lost or Damaged Boats:
For many people living near the coastline, protecting a boat is an important part of hurricane preparation. Boats stored on land are much more likely to weather a storm successfully than those stored on the water. If you have to leave your boat in the water, secure it in a snug harbor, away from rocks and other damaging elements, with as many ties as possible keeping it in place.

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SAVE MONEY ON YOUR INSURANCE PREMIUMS WITH CAT 5 SHUTTERS INSTALLING YOUR HURRICANE PROTECTION SYSTEM

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on January 22, 2014

SAVE MONEY ON YOUR INSURANCE PREMIUMS WITH CAT 5 SHUTTERS INSTALLING YOUR HURRICANE PROTECTION SYSTEMFlorida law requires insurance companies to offer homeowners discounts or credits for existing building features or home improvements that reduce damage and loss from hurricanes. Florida insurance companies are required to file these discounts with the Office of Insurance Regulation.

This Web site www.cat5hurricaneshutterswpb.com offers homeowners general information by insurance companies and explains what range of discounts may be available. Discount information is available for an estimated 60 insurance companies on this Web site, and updates will continue to be posted.

A new law passed during the 2006 Session requires the Office of Insurance Regulation to evaluate all discounts filed by insurance companies and to ensure insurance companies are providing eligible homeowners with applicable discounts by July 1, 2007.
The discounts presented at the end of the survey are given as a percentage of the wind portion of your total insurance premium. The wind portion of your premium is between 15 and 70 percent of your total premium, depending on where you live in Florida.

HOW TO APPLY FOR YOUR INSURANCE DISCOUNT

1. Contact your agent or your company directly to find out the specific items for which discounts are available.

2. Verify the amount of the discount for each item as it applies to YOUR policy. For example: Hurricane shutters will result in a 30 percent discount on the windstorm premium. The windstorm premium is $300 of the total $600 annual premium. Therefore, the discount will equal a $90 annual savings on the premium.

3. Request the specific criteria that is needed to apply for and receive the discounts that are listed for your company. Example: Does the roof need to be inspected by a certified wind inspector? Do the shutters need to meet a specific wind resistance rating?

4. Verify the documentation that needs to be submitted in order to apply for and receive the discounts. Example: photos of the items installed, proof of purchase and installation.

5. Verify to whom the documentation should be submitted. Be sure to keep copies of all documentation, the date submitted and the mailing verification information.

6. Request confirmation of when the discount will take effect.

7. Verify if the discount will be in the form of a premium discount, a credit to your premium balance or a refund on premium paid.

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Home Insurance and Hurricane Protection Products

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on January 20, 2014

Home Insurance and Hurricane Protection Products

 

Homeowners insurance helps pay to repair or rebuild your home and replace personal property due to a covered loss.
 The term “homeowners’ policy” simply means you have a package policy that includes coverage (1) against the insured’s property being destroyed or damaged by various perils (causes of loss) and (2) coverage for personal liability exposures of the insured. A homeowners’ policy includes coverage for the residence premises, unattached structures, personal property and personal liability.

Insurance Tips To Prepare for Hurricane Season

Before hurricane season starts each year, you should review your insurance coverage with your agent. Insurance policies provided by the JUA are more expensive than those issued by other companies, but they are available as a last resort before a hurricane hits, if you don’t have homeowner’s insurance.
Other insurance companies may not want to provide insurance once a hurricane is within striking distance.
 Make sure you have adequate coverage, especially if you have made any additions to your home, have expensive items or have had you property value increase.
Check your policy for windstorm and flood coverage. Make sure your standard homeowner’s policy covers windstorm damage caused by wind or hail. Consider purchasing flood insurance if your home is in a flood zone as determined by the National Flood Insurance Program.
Since there is an automatic five-day waiting period for flood insurance, purchasing flood insurance should be done before hurricane season. Know what your policy does and doesn’t cover.

Review your policy for deductible, exclusion and coverage information including: relocation, temporary living expenses and personal injury. Standard homeowners’ policies usually limit coverage on valuable jewelry, silver and guns. Update your list of personal belongings.
Maintain a current room-by-room inventory, including: serial numbers, purchase dates and cost of valuables. If your home is damaged or destroyed, it will be hard to remember details. Since your insurance company may require proof of cost, attach receipts to the inventory list. Videotapes or photographs are a good way to document your personal inventory. Safeguard your records. Keep a copy of your policy and your inventory records in a safe deposit box. Make two copies; keep one in a fireproof home vault and give the other to a friend or relative. If your property is damaged, you will need quick access to this information.For more information on insurance coverage, call Florida’s toll-free Insurance Consumer Help line at 1-800-342-2762 or 1-800-528-7094.

HURRICANE PROTECTION PRODUCTS

Without protection, your home is at risk if a hurricane strikes. All windows and doors should be protected with products that meet the new building code. Shutters, windows and doors that meet strict hurricane resistance standards are classified as “hurricane protection products.”

In addition to new shutters, there are also hurricane-resistant windows and doors that provide protection without using shutters. These windows and doors seal against the rain and windblown debris. If hurricane-force winds happen to get inside the house, your roof will not survive. Roofs are not designed to withstand wind pressure pushing up from the inside. Since hurricane- force winds can come from any direction, it’s important to protect the entire house.

Contact CAT 5 Shutters LLC for all your hurricane protection needs. Call us toll free at 1-877-CAT-FIVE or visit uson the web at www.cat5hurricaneshutterswpb.com

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Winter is here South Florida- Welcome change?

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on January 16, 2014

Winter is here South Florida- Welcome change?Colder this morning! It’s only going to warm up a few degrees as Arctic air swings into South Florida on a gusty northwest wind today.

Today: Sunny, windy and cold, high 60. NW 20 mph.
Tonight: Freeze warnings for the Treasure Coast and a freeze watch for inland areas of Palm Beach County west of 441. There also could be frost for areas west of the turnpike. Protect sensitive plants and pets.
Friday: Sunny and cool, High 68.
Another cold front Friday night will keep us chilly over the weekend.
Saturday, sunny with highs in the mid 60s
Saturday night clear and cold with lows in the upper 30s to near 40.

Sunday: Sunny and cool, highs in the upper 60s.

Next Week: Slow warm up to start the week, then another big cool down mid week.

Stay Warm South Florida.

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