Hurrican Shutters

Installing "Peace of Mind"

Typoon Update-

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on November 12, 2013

Typoon Update-The desperate survivors scrounging for food amid the mountains of debris use cloth to shield their noses from the overpowering stench of rotting corpses. Some relatives have been trying to bury their dead, but in too many cases, there is no one to cart away the corpses littering the city of Tacloban, which was all but decimated by one of the most powerful storms to ever make landfall.”Those are dead people in front of our house and the smell is awful,” a woman told a reporter from The Guardian newspaper. “The sister of the dead man came to see her brother, but she couldn’t take him away, she just cried. What else can she do?” the woman asked. “There is nowhere to take him, nothing to do.”The typhoon struck Friday with 147-mph winds and a 20-foot fall of seawater. Authorities estimate the storm killed 10,000 or more people, but so far no one has been able to count all the bodies.Typhoon Haiyan recovery: How you can helpAnd with shattered communications and transportation links, the final count was likely days away. Presidential spokesman Edwin Lacierda said “we pray” it does not surpass 10,000.The government raised the official death toll Tuesday to 1,744, with the final number expected to be much higher.The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council also said 2,487 people were hurt.Authorities estimated that the storm displaced about 660,000 others.”I don’t believe there is a single structure that is not destroyed or severely damaged in some way – every single building, every single house,” U.S. Marine Brig. Gen. Paul Kennedy said after taking a helicopter flight over Tacloban, the largest city in Leyte province. He spoke on the tarmac at the airport, where two Marine C-130 cargo planes were parked, engines running, unloading supplies. Red Cross official describes “complete devastation” in Tacloban. Authorities said at least 9.7 million people in 41 provinces were affected by the typhoon, known as Haiyan elsewhere in Asia but called Yolanda in the Philippines. It was likely the deadliest natural disaster to beset this poor Southeast Asian nation.”Help. SOS. We need food,” read a message painted by a survivor in large letters on Tacloban’s port.In the ravaged city, residents stripped malls, shops and homes of food, water and consumer goods. Officials said some of the looting smacked of desperation but in other cases people hauled away TVs, refrigerators, Christmas trees and even a treadmill. An Associated Press reporter said he saw about 400 special forces and soldiers patrolling downtown to guard against further chaos.Kennedy said Philippine forces were handling security well and U.S. troops were “looking at how to open up roads and land planes and helicopters” in order to bring in shelter, water and other supplies. Still, collapsed roads and bridges, and streets clogged with debris, have made it hard for relief workers to reach the survivors lining up for food, water and medicine, “We are so very hungry and thirsty,” a woman with tears rolling down her face told a BBC News reporter. She said she had been sleeping by a roadside because her house was flattened by the storm Other survivors were anxious to get word to relatives.”Please tell my family I’m alive,” said Erika Mae Karakot as she stood among a throng of people waiting for aid. “We need water and medicine because a lot of the people we are with are wounded. Some are suffering from diarrhea and dehydration due to shortage of food and water.”Philippine soldiers were distributing food and water, and assessment teams from the United Nations and other international agencies were seen Monday for the first time. The U.S. military dispatched food, water, generators and a contingent of Marines to the city, the first outside help in what will swell into a major international relief mission.The United States has pledged $20 million in immediate aid and has ordered the aircraft carrier USS George Washington to the sail to the Philippines to provide assistance in the wake of the typhoon. It was expected to arrive in about two days. A similar sized U.S. ship, and its fleet of helicopters capable of dropping tons of water daily and evacuating wounded, was credited with saving scores of lives after the 2004 Asian tsunami.Emily Ortega, 21 and about to give birth, said she clung to a post to survive after the evacuation center she fled to was devastated by the 20-foot storm surge. She reached safety at the airport, where she gave birth to a baby girl, Bea Joy Sagales, whose arrival drew applause from the military medics who assisted in the delivery.

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