Hurrican Shutters

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Archive for September, 2013

Hurricane Film for Hurricane protection- New Trend

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on September 27, 2013

Hurricane Film for Hurricane protection- New TrendAlthough it’s main job is protection, safety and security window films can also alleviate sun control problems. When a tinted safety or security film that is selected, you receive additional benefits from the film such as reduces energy costs from reflected heat, reduced glare and improved comfort.

A national retail chain recently experienced a break-in at a store in Stuart, Florida. Burglars smashed through the windows, reached in, and quickly grabbed $35,000 worth of jewelry, before police officers could respond to the store’s security alarm. The company wanted to do something to defend its assets in the event of another burglary attempt.

Tested Tough

To increase public safety, lawmakers developed human impact standards mandating specific strength levels for glass. Climate Insulating Products carries only window films that pass and meet certain standards. All installers are certified to install safety and security film. To reach the required levels, glass had to be tempered or heat strengthened, however annealed glass needs window film or other enhancements to achieve compliance when necessary. The two most commonly accepted human impact standards are:
American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z 97.1 – testing involves glass impact of 100 and 150 foot pounds, the standard most commonly used for residential applications.
Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) Code Federal Regulations (CFR) 1201, category II – testing involves glass impact of 400 foot pounds, the standard more commonly used for commercial applications.
ANSI Z97.1 and CPSC 16 CFR 1201 Cat I and II
General Services Administration (GSA) Level 3b United Facilities Criteria (UFC)
ASTM Large Missile Level C and Small Missile requirements
Underwriters Laboratory UL972 Forced Entry requirements
Factory Mutual FM Approvals 4350 Small Missile
EN356, level P2A

Flexible Application
From corporate and retail to hospitality and educational applications, Climate Insulating Products offers high-performance films that can help you control or even eliminate the danger and damage caused by broken glass in new construction and retrofit projects. Strong, clear safety and security films offer a broad range of solar and aesthetic solutions to compliment the demands of any commercial project.

Protecting your windows is perhaps one of the most important factors in securing your home or office in a hurricane. Since Hurricane Andrew, many of South Florida’s building codes have been changed to emphasize stronger structures and impact resistant windows. The glass in any building is the weakest point of the structure. It is of the utmost importance to secure these areas effectively. During Hurricane Andrew, many homes sustained severe roof damage primarily because the windows did not stay intact. 3M Scotchshield helps maintain the integrity of the buildings outer shell to help keep wind, rain, and flying glass shards from wreaking havoc inside the building.

Protecting your windows is perhaps one of the most important factors in securing your home or office in a hurricane. Since Hurricane Andrew, many of South Florida’s building codes have been changed to emphasize stronger structures and impact resistant windows. The glass in any building is the weakest point of the structure. It is of the utmost importance to secure these areas effectively. During Hurricane Andrew, many homes sustained severe roof damage primarily because the windows did not stay intact. 3M Scotchshield helps maintain the integrity of the buildings outer shell to help keep wind, rain, and flying glass shards from wreaking havoc inside the building.

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What climate changes means for future hurricanes

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on September 26, 2013

What climate changes means for future hurricanes

A hurricane is, put simply, a giant heat engine. In the North Atlantic basin, where many storms that impact the U.S. form, it takes a combination of factors to create one: tropical winds blowing off the coast of Africa, warm ocean waters, and a vast swath of warm, moist air to act as a conveyor toward the East and Gulf coasts
When these meet and form a hurricane over the Atlantic, the storm they create sucks up heat from the ocean to power itself. That’s largely why hurricane scientists are confident that the strongest storms will become even stronger by 2100, when Earth’s land and sea temperatures are expected to warm to levels unseen since the Eemian period, more than 120,000 years ago.
Because so many factors influence their development, however – hurricanes are notoriously “fussy creations” that can be torn apart by wind shear and dry air after gathering strength over thousands of miles of ocean, Dr. Jeff Masters of Weather Underground notes – forecasting them with accuracy can be difficult just days in advance, let alone decades.
Among climate scientists, the intensity and frequency of future hurricanes has been hotly debated in recent years. In 2007, a report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) suggested that the number of hurricanes both in the Atlantic and around the world might fall in a warming world, thanks largely to the higher wind shear and drier air possible on a hotter planet.
But the newest climate models – which will be used in the IPCC’s upcoming report in September – suggest that future hurricanes may instead become even more powerful and occur more frequently.
Using these new models, Dr. Kerry Emanuel, a professor of atmospheric science at MIT and one of the world’s top hurricane scientists, published a paper in July that said the world could see as much as a 40 percent jump in the number of major hurricanes (Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson scale) over the next century.
“The behavior of these strongest hurricanes is critical, since they do most of the damage we observe,” Masters notes, adding that Category 4 and 5 hurricanes made up only 6 percent of all U.S. landfalls over the past century, but they caused nearly half of all U.S. damage during that time.
‘We can’t stop these powerful storms’ USGS
High storm surge and wave run-up caused widespread dune erosion in Nags Head, N.C., during 2003’s Hurricane Isabel.

Still, there’s a great deal of uncertainty even in the latest reports, Masters adds. What isn’t uncertain at all is the rapidly rising amount of damage hurricanes cause – it doubles every decade in the United States, at a time when climate change isn’t yet considered a factor.
Had the Great Miami Hurricane of 1926, a Category 4 monster, instead hit Miami Beach in 2005, it would have caused some $150 billion in damage, according to the authors of a 2008 report on U.S. hurricane damage between 1900 and 2005. By 2015, that number would be about $300 billion – twice the damage caused by Katrina, in 2013 dollars.
Why is that damage accumulating so quickly? Because people have been migrating to the coast by the millions. Between 1970 and 2010, the population of America’s shoreline counties grew by nearly 40 percent and are now home to more than 123 million people, or nearly 40 percent of the country’s entire population. By 2020, that number is expected to grow by another 10 million.
Perhaps that’s what Dr. Orrin Pilkey, a professor emeritus of geology at Duke University and the author of more than a dozen books on beaches, sea level rise and climate change, had in mind when he penned his Nov. 14, 2012, editorial in The New York Times titled “We Need to Retreat From the Beach.”
The magnitude of Sandy, which had slammed into New York and New Jersey just two weeks earlier, was still fresh in the public’s mind as Pilkey implored the nation to see storms like it for what they really are: a sign of things to come.
“This ‘let’s come back stronger and better’ attitude, though empowering, is the wrong approach to the increasing hazard of living close to the rising sea,” he wrote. “We can’t stop these powerful storms. But we can reduce the deaths and damage they cause.”
Preventing those losses isn’t easy, however, when government policies encourage people to rebuild in areas ravaged by storms that are likely to get hit again.
Building (again and again) in harm’s way USGS
An aerial view of Dauphin Island, which experienced dramatic shoreline erosion after Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

Consider the case of Dauphin Island, Ala., whose 6.2 square miles are home to just over 1,300 people near Mobile. For decades, the island has been raked by hurricane after hurricane and would likely have been long abandoned were it not for the federal government, which has reportedly spent some $80 million rebuilding homes, bridges, roads and sewers here repeatedly since the late 1970s.
What persuades the people of Dauphin Island to stay and rebuild – as well as many other at-risk coastal communities like it around the country – are programs like subsidized federal flood insurance and the Stafford Act, a federal law that covers most of the cost to repair infrastructure destroyed by storms.
“If the federal government is in there, trying to protect this investment property on the oceanfront, then why in the world would these people not rebuild?” asks Young. “We’re creating this moral hazard, where we provide incentives for these towns and individual property owners to make the wrong decision. But from their perspective, it’s a no-brainer.”
State governments have gotten in on the act, too. In 2010, State Farm Florida canceled 125,000 home insurance policies, mostly in hurricane-prone areas. The company cited severe losses from a string of hurricanes in the mid-2000s, which it said made it impossible to provide coverage after failing to win a 47 percent rate increase from state regulators.
Who saved the day for those 125,000 homeowners? The state government of Florida, which set up a risk pool that today has more than a million policies in force, many in areas hit by hurricanes multiple times through the years.
It may only be a matter of time before costs of repairing and rebuilding after increasingly damaging storms force governments and coastal communities to make different choices in how they respond, however.
When is the right time to retreat? USACE
Sand is moved around the shoreline of Delaware’s Rehoboth Beach during a beach re-nourishment project there in 2012.

Globally, sea levels are projected to rise between 1 and 5 feet by 2100, a range that reflects best- and worst-case scenarios for controlling (or failing to control) greenhouse gas emissions over the rest of the century.
The rate of sea level rise locally, however, relies also on factors like the shape of the land where it meets the ocean and whether the ground is rising or falling, a phenomenon called subsidence.
This is happening rapidly in places like the Mississippi River Delta, where some 1,900 square miles of land have vanished into the sea since the 1930s, after decades of building levees and cutting canals for oil and gas pipelines through fragile wetlands.
Coastal cities and towns deploy a range of defenses against rising seas and erosion, from building dunes and seawalls to re-nourishing their beaches with sand dredged up from the ocean floor. But these defenses only work for a while, especially on barrier islands, notes Dr. Dylan McNamara, an assistant professor of oceanography at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington.
When natural erosion and overwash are blocked by man-made structures, big storms can deliver a much more devastating blow, he said. “They don’t let the barrier island do the things that it would like to do, so the time the big one comes, the island is in much worse position than it would have been otherwise.”
Earlier this year, McNamara co-authored a study in the journal Nature Climate Change that asked, what makes homeowners decide it’s time to give up on the coast? The answer, he found, lies in whether they look to the past as their only guide for the future, or take seriously the projections for rising seas in the future.
Economic incentives – such as rising rents and cheap insurance – were a powerful draw to stay for people who owned these properties, he said. But they didn’t make the difference that large hurricane and storm surge events did, when combined with the highest expected rise in sea levels.
“Those would be the shocks to the system that people would start to register, and say, ‘uh-oh, that was so damaging, I don’t want to go through that again,'” he added. “‘As I’m projecting into the future, I don’t want to have to pay those costs again and again – so I’m outta here.'”
A new era of coastal defense? US Army
An aerial view of the devastation wrought by Hurricane Sandy on the New Jersey coastline, taken Oct. 30, 2012.

In the era before the development of America’s coastlines exploded, natural processes controlled their shape and their destiny. That era has passed, McNamara says.
“Human beings are now a fundamental and intrinsic part of the entire [coastal] system,” he adds. “You can’t project what’s going to happen to the system in the future without understanding the kinds of decisions that human beings are going to make.”
The silver lining of storms like Katrina and Sandy, Young says, is the opportunity they offer to “take that step back from the ocean, and reduce the vulnerability to the next event,” by widening the buffer between the ocean and coastal infrastructure.
“That’s the best chance,” he adds. “Because when the coast is built, when we’ve got a completely developed oceanfront, we’re not going to go in there and tear down buildings – that’s never going to happen in America.”
But coastal development is only expected to keep growing sharply, not just in the U.S. but around the world, notes Laurence C. Smith, a climate scientist at UCLA and author of The World in 2050: Four Forces Shaping Civilization’s Northern Future.
If current population growth trends continue, he explains in the book, by the 2070s the number of people exposed to the risk of flooding worldwide is expected to triple, while the dollar amount of economic assets exposed to flooding – like buildings, utilities and transportation infrastructure – is expected to rise by tenfold.
“Clearly, we are about to begin paying great attention to a new kind of defense spending,” Smith writes. “It’s called coastal defense.

Get your home protected by a licensed and insured company. CAT 5 Shutters LLC offers free estimates on any type of hurricane protection your home may need. Visit our website at www.cat5hurricaneshutterswpb.com and let us know what we can do for you.

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Dangers of installing hurricane protection yourself.

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on September 25, 2013

Dangers of installing hurricane protection yourself.With the types of shutters in mind and good information about different types of fasteners and anchors, you can decide what shutter solutions are best suited for your house and budget and pick the type of anchor to use for your house. A table giving anchor size and spacing, using a one-size-fits-all philosophy, is included a little further down on this page. If you follow that spacing guidance, you can achieve a solid permanent anchor system for your shutters. Next you will need to have or develop skill at installing fasteners into the walls of your house. This will likely involve skills at which you may not be practiced. This is especially true for concrete and concrete block installations that, in many situations and with most anchors and fasteners, require installation experience to ensure that the connections can withstand the vibrations created by hurricane winds. Special, though not exotic, tools may be required, such as a hammer drill, metal cutting blade for a skill saw, tools for setting anchors, ladders, etc. If you have these skills and have or can borrow or rent tools, then you may well want to consider installing shutters yourself. Bear in mind that to feel safe and be safe, shutter systems must be designed properly and installed properly. Cost will likely be an important consideration when deciding whether to do it yourself or not. So bear in mind that though some panels may seem relatively inexpensive based on the square foot price of raw materials (such as plywood, or polycarbonates, etc.) you need to carefully lay out your panels and consider how much wasted material there will be that will raise the overall cost. Unfortunately cutting shutters from 4’x8′ pieces of plywood or polycarbonate product will frequently result in a lot of scraps you can’t use. Unless windows are small, you should figure that each window will require one 4 by 8 sheet of panel material. A typical bedroom window that is 3’ by less than 6’ will consume a full sheet, leaving scraps so small that they are practically worthless.
Professional installation relieves you of the burden of designing the shutter system and the physical task of installing them. It does not relieve you of the burden of selecting a reputable and competent installation company that is capable of designing shutter systems and then getting them installed. CAT 5 Shutters, LLC is a license and insured company with references readily available. Visit us at www.cat5hurricaneshutterswpb.com . We provide free estimates.
The design aspect may be made less risky if your building department requires a building permit and the building department is knowledgeable and able to review the shutter plans. Building departments cannot usually have the knowledge or time to make effective inspections of all installations. This is a weak link without an easy answer. One of the problems is that some shutter installation companies subcontract out the installation and do not have the incentive, knowledge, or will to inspect the installations themselves. CAT 5 Shutters, LLC does not subcontract out any of our work and we even manufacture on the premises. At times, the largest problems with hurricane shutter systems are the lead time for orders and installation backlog. For this reason, you will want to arrange for professionally installed shutters well in advance of the hurricane season. It is likely that having shutters made and installed during the off-season will save you money as well. Alternatively, you may choose the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) option, which can offer equal protection, reduced costs, and faster installation with minimal tools and average tools skills. There are several things to consider prior to selecting a DIY system. Building codes are required and no matter who installs the hurricane protection the job must pass inspections and be up to code. For any additional information please don’t hesitate to call Cat 5 Shutters, LLC located in West Palm Beach, Florida at 561-333-Cat5 . We look forward to answering any questions you may have.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Dangers of installing hurricane protection yourself.

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on September 25, 2013

Dangers of installing hurricane protection yourself.With the types of shutters in mind and good information about different types of fasteners and anchors, you can decide what shutter solutions are best suited for your house and budget and pick the type of anchor to use for your house. A table giving anchor size and spacing, using a one-size-fits-all philosophy, is included a little further down on this page. If you follow that spacing guidance, you can achieve a solid permanent anchor system for your shutters. Next you will need to have or develop skill at installing fasteners into the walls of your house. This will likely involve skills at which you may not be practiced. This is especially true for concrete and concrete block installations that, in many situations and with most anchors and fasteners, require installation experience to ensure that the connections can withstand the vibrations created by hurricane winds. Special, though not exotic, tools may be required, such as a hammer drill, metal cutting blade for a skill saw, tools for setting anchors, ladders, etc. If you have these skills and have or can borrow or rent tools, then you may well want to consider installing shutters yourself. Bear in mind that to feel safe and be safe, shutter systems must be designed properly and installed properly. Cost will likely be an important consideration when deciding whether to do it yourself or not. So bear in mind that though some panels may seem relatively inexpensive based on the square foot price of raw materials (such as plywood, or polycarbonates, etc.) you need to carefully lay out your panels and consider how much wasted material there will be that will raise the overall cost. Unfortunately cutting shutters from 4’x8′ pieces of plywood or polycarbonate product will frequently result in a lot of scraps you can’t use. Unless windows are small, you should figure that each window will require one 4 by 8 sheet of panel material. A typical bedroom window that is 3’ by less than 6’ will consume a full sheet, leaving scraps so small that they are practically worthless.
Professional installation relieves you of the burden of designing the shutter system and the physical task of installing them. It does not relieve you of the burden of selecting a reputable and competent installation company that is capable of designing shutter systems and then getting them installed. CAT 5 Shutters, LLC is a license and insured company with references readily available. Visit us at www.cat5hurricaneshutterswpb.com . We provide free estimates.
The design aspect may be made less risky if your building department requires a building permit and the building department is knowledgeable and able to review the shutter plans. Building departments cannot usually have the knowledge or time to make effective inspections of all installations. This is a weak link without an easy answer. One of the problems is that some shutter installation companies subcontract out the installation and do not have the incentive, knowledge, or will to inspect the installations themselves. CAT 5 Shutters, LLC does not subcontract out any of our work and we even manufacture on the premises. At times, the largest problems with hurricane shutter systems are the lead time for orders and installation backlog. For this reason, you will want to arrange for professionally installed shutters well in advance of the hurricane season. It is likely that having shutters made and installed during the off-season will save you money as well. Alternatively, you may choose the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) option, which can offer equal protection, reduced costs, and faster installation with minimal tools and average tools skills. There are several things to consider prior to selecting a DIY system. Building codes are required and no matter who installs the hurricane protection the job must pass inspections and be up to code. For any additional information please don’t hesitate to call Cat 5 Shutters, LLC located in West Palm Beach, Florida at 561-333-Cat5 . We look forward to answering any questions you may have.

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Wind Mitigation For Homeowners Insurance

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on September 24, 2013

Wind Mitigation For Homeowners InsuranceFacts about Wind Mitigation Inspections:

Windstorm Insurance rates are reduced substancially with a Wind Mitigation Wind Inspection. From a few hundred dollars to a few thousand dollars depending on value of the home and the amount of protections you have. A wind mitigation inspection verifies construction methods that create wind mitigation discounts based on those methods providing greater protection from wind hurricane damage.
With the “My Safe Home” program discontinued by the State of Florida, wind mitigation inspections should only be conducted by Licensed Building Contractors or Architects Certified by the State of Florida, your insurance provider would send out their inspectors unless you would like another opinion. Buyer should get an inspector out if any upgrades to any type of hurricane protection is done on their home. They can call their insurance company whom would be able to send out a license inspector.

All of the following structure types qualify for Wind Mitigation Inspections:

Single Family Homes
Multi-Family Buildings
Commercial Buildings
Condominiums
Townhomes

Discounts Occur when Dwelling Structures have Elements that
Minimize Damage from High Wind Events like Tropical Storms and
Hurricanes. They include:

Actual Roof Shape
Reinforced Roof Decking
Roof Shingle Attachment Method
Shutter Protection Over Your Windows
Hurricane Straps and/or Hurricane Clips
Hurricane protection on all Doors and Windows
Other Wind Resilient Construction Techniques…

According to Florida Statute 627.0629, ALL insurance companies are required to offer Florida homeowners “discounts, credits, or other rate differentials…” for particular construction techniques that help to reduce wind damage caused by hurricanes, tropical storms and other windstorms related claim. However if you do not contact your insurance company about these discounts they will not offer them. Insurance companies will just assume no protections is on the property until other wise notified.

Wind Mitigation Discounts

Wind Mitigation discounts are applied towards the windstorm portion of your total insurance premium. Depending on where you are located in Florida, the windstorm portion is between 15% and 70% of the total premium. Premium determination is very complex and actual dollar discounts are not calculated here. For exact quotes, you must contact your insurance agent or the individual insurance company in question. The three main factors for wind mitigation discounts include:
The number of wind resistive construction features present on your condo or home – The more wind resistive features you have, the higher the total discount will be for your property. The discounts can be as high as 30% or more of the wind portion of the insurance premium.

The location of your condo or home – Discounted wind insurance rates are adjusted according to where your property is located within the state. If your wind insurance rates are high, then the percentage discounts will be greater for a condo or house in a high rate area versus the same condo or house in a lower rate area.
The value of your condo or home – High value condos or homes have higher premiums. Therefore, the value of the discounts will increase with the value of the condo or home.

Will You Qualify For Wind Mitigation Discounts?

Wind mitigation discounts are justified because stronger, more wind-resistive houses have lower windstorm losses. Lower windstorm losses equal reduced costs to insurance companies that are then passed on to the consumer. Many homeowners have taken advantage of the insurance discount incentive and strengthened their existing condo or home using the strongest options in the Florida Building Code. The discounted insurance rates in Florida apply to both existing construction (condos and homes built prior to 2002) and new construction built to the new statewide Florida Building Code (FBC).

The Following Items are Building Features that Reduce Wind Damage.

Shingles or other roof coverings that meet the Florida Building Code requirements

Roof decking that has been installed with larger nails or screws with closer spacing

Hurricane clips and/or straps that secure the roof structure to the supporting walls

Full or partial protection of windows and glass doors with impact resistant glazing or other protection methods.

Secondary water resistance barrier that prevents the roof from leaking if the shingles are blown off in a windstorm.

Take a look around your home and  see if anything can be upgraded or if anything needs to be done. CAT 5 Shutters, LLC can come out and give free estimates on hurricane protection needs. It just might save you a few bucks on your insurance premiums. Visit us at www.cat5hurricaneshutterswpb.com.

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