Hurrican Shutters

Installing "Peace of Mind"

Archive for August, 2012

Hurricane Safety: After fter a Hurricane

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on August 31, 2012

Hurricane Safety: After fter a HurricaneDangers from a tropical storm or hurricane do not end with the storm. Lives can be lost in the aftermath of a storm if simple safety rules are not followed.

• Wait until authorities announce it is safe before attempting to return home.
• Know that first responders may be delayed in reaching your community or impacted area for a prolonged period.
• Avoid roads covered by water and/or debris, and avoid downed power lines.
• Bring necessities, such as food and water, with you when you return.
• Only use a generator in a well-ventilated area and adhere to all manufacturer instructions.
• Use flashlights instead of candles.
• Check food in your refrigerator for spoilage, but keep any water. It may be some time before you can rely on the quality of tap water.
• Keep children and pets inside. If pets must be walked outside, keep them on a leash.
• Watch for snakes and other animals possibly forced into your home by flood waters.
• Wear sturdy shoes and protective clothing during any cleaning. Have a professional check for structural damage to your home, as well as the quality of service from your water, gas, electric, and sewer lines.
• Contact your insurance company to begin the claims process.

You can help people affected by disasters, such as hurricanes by donating to the American Red Cross. To make a donation, please visit http://www.redcross.org/charitable-donations.

Distributed by Viestly

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Tropics Watch: Kirk and Leslie Spin in the Atlantic

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on August 31, 2012

Tropics Watch: Kirk and Leslie Spin in the AtlanticWe are currently tracking Kirk and Leslie in the Atlantic basin. We also have an active tropical system in the eastern Pacific. You can find more information on these systems by clicking on the links below or by reading our full Tropical Update article.

The above image is an overview of the Atlantic and eastern Pacific Ocean basins, based on analysis provided by Senior Meteorologist Stu Ostro (On Twitter | On Facebook) and Hurricane Specialist Bryan Norcross (On Twitter | On Facebook). Named storms, hurricanes, or depressions in either basin will be labeled on the graphic. Any other features of interest we’re keeping an eye on for possible development will be circled.

If there are areas of interest, you’ll find zoomed-in details in the next few images. Otherwise, we’ll provide perspective graphics on tropical cyclone climatology for the current month, as well as status updates on the season-to-date.

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Tropics Watch: Isaac, Kirk, and Invest 98-L

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on August 29, 2012

Tropics Watch: Isaac, Kirk, and Invest 98-LWe are monitoring low pressure (Invest 98-L) in the Atlantic for the possibility of development as it moves westward the next couple of days.

2012 Atlantic Hurricane Season Scorecard

Above is the season-to-date tally of named storms, hurricanes, and major hurricanes, compared to the “average pace” to this point.

The May duo of Tropical Storm Alberto and Tropical Storm Beryl, followed by the bizarre Hurricane Chris and Florida’s drought-quenching Tropical Storm Debby, put us well ahead of the pace. Later, Hurricane Ernesto, Tropical Storm Florence, Hurricane Gordon and Tropical Storm Helene added to the total. The most recent named storms have been Isaac, Joyce and Kirk.

On average, the tenth Atlantic storm (“J” storm) arrives by October 19. The earliest-named “J” storm was Jose on August 22 in 2005; this year’s Joyce tied for the second-earliest on record.

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WEATHER ALERT!!!

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on August 28, 2012

WEATHER ALERT!!!..THE FLOOD WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 830 PM EDT FOR EASTERN
PALM BEACH AND EASTERN BROWARD COUNTIES…

AT 306 PM EDT…NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED
A BAND OF HEAVY RAIN OVER PALM BEACH COUNTY ALONG AND WEST OF THE
FLORIDA TURNPIKE. WHILE MUCH OF BROWARD COUNTY HAS BEEN DRY TODAY,
THIS BAND COULD BACK BUILD SOUTHWARD AND INTO BROWARD COUNTY…OVER
AREAS WHICH SAW TORRENTIAL RAINS THE PAST FEW DAYS…AND PRESENT
ADDITIONAL FLOODING CONCERNS.

MOST FLOOD DEATHS OCCUR IN AUTOMOBILES. NEVER DRIVE YOUR VEHICLE INTO
AREAS WHERE THE WATER COVERS THE ROADWAY. FLOOD WATERS ARE USUALLY
DEEPER THAN THEY APPEAR. WHEN ENCOUNTERING FLOODED ROADS MAKE THE
SMART CHOICE…TURN AROUND…DONT DROWN.

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Isaac has been upgraded to a Hurricane

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on August 28, 2012

Isaac has been upgraded to a HurricaneHurricane Isaac continues to be a major threat to communities along the Gulf coast, with 75 mph maximum wind speeds.

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Protect Your Business – A hurricane is headed your way: What do you do now?

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on August 27, 2012

Protect Your Business - A hurricane is headed your way: What do you do now?If your business is in the projected path of a hurricane, you need to act quickly to protect your people and your property.

Steps you take now can go a long way toward keeping people safe
and minimizing damage:

Be sure that employee contact lists are up to date
Secure all doors and board up windows to protect against flying debris
Clean out floor drains and catch basins and check drainage pumps
Anchor and fill above-ground tanks with water or product to keep them in place during the storm

Fill the fuel tanks on your emergency generator and fire pumps. Make sure automobiles have full fuel tanks, as well
Check to see that your fire protection equipment is working
Make sure your important records are protected – or duplicate them and move them offsite to a safe area

Shut off lines carrying gas or flammable liquids in case a pipe breaks in the storm
Shut down production processes safely and turn off the electricity at the main power source
Evacuate employees

And don’t forget to tie down – or move inside – any items outside your building that could blow away in a powerful windstorm. Benches, chairs, plant urns, signs or potted flowers could become flying debris and cause substantial damage.

An action plan for hurricane recovery

Once the winds have died down utilize your employee call list to make sure they and their families are safe and secure. Assemble a recovery team to begin getting your business back on its feet.

Who should be on your recovery team? Include people qualified to repair electrical, mechanical, plumbing and fire protection systems, as well as general maintenance people for cleanup. The team leader should make sure the team has cleanup supplies and any necessary replacement parts and equipment.

The team leader should assess the damage and develop an action plan that addresses priorities such as:

Safety hazards, including downed power lines, exposed electrical wires, leaking gas, etc.
Structural damage to buildings or damaged foundations

Impaired fire protection equipment and alarms
Critical production equipment and valuable stock required to restore production

Completion of temporary repairs so people can access the building safely

Here’s what your recovery team should do:

Require strict precautionary measures for any cutting or welding
Eliminate any unnecessary ignition sources and enforce “No Smoking” regulations

Establish a procedure for removing storm- or reconstruction-related debris
Temporarily repair any holes or damage to building walls

Assess and prioritize damaged contents to see what can be salvaged
Photograph and/or videotape any damage

In addition, your team will need to assess and repair fire protection equipment, security alarms and sprinkler systems and notify the fire department if any of those systems will be out of service.

Be extra careful during electrical restoration, and make sure an electrician has checked and dried all systems and equipment before energizing electrical circuits. Take care around damaged power cables.

All mechanical equipment and systems should be checked for leaks or damage and cleaned and dried, as needed. Any wet insulation should be stripped and restored. Be sure to test your water supply for possible contamination, as well.

Maintain adequate security by performing a continual fire watch until normal operations can resume. Provide your employees with portable radios or cell phones and instruct them how to contact emergency response units.

Finally, keep your employees informed about any unsafe conditions and keep them updated on the progress of salvage operations.

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Be hurricane-smart — Get the facts

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on August 27, 2012

Be hurricane-smart — Get the factsBe hurricane-smart — Get the facts

As we are in the middle of Hurricane Season 2012 and Hurricane ISAAC has left its destruction behind in Southern Florida and is headed to New Orleans, below is some insider information about Hurricanes from http://www.Travelers.com:

You might have heard that taping a big “X” on your windows will protect them and keep you safe in a hurricane. Actually, that “X” will not protect your windows from being shattered by the wind.

You only need to protect the windows facing the water. WRONG..All windows and glass doors should be secured to guard against high winds and flying objects.

If you lean against a window or door, you can keep it from blowing inward. WRONG.. Not a good idea. You are putting yourself in danger remaining in front of windows and doors.

You may have heard that opening windows will alleviate pressure.  No. Stay away from windows and keep them shut.

The biggest myth is that “it won’t happen here.”  Although all of us hope we will not be affected by a hurricane, it is always safer for you, your family, and business to be prepared.

Are you ready for a hurricane?
A watch is just that – meteorologists are watching a storm with hurricane conditions that may strike within 48 hours.

A warning is more serious – hurricane force winds (74 mph or higher) are expected to hit your area within 36 hours.

With either type of alert, it is important to be prepared. What you do beforehand can determine how well you weather the storm and recover from it. Here are some preparation tips:

Prepare a survival kit that includes water and non-perishable food for everyone including your pets; a portable radio; flashlights and batteries.
Plan your evacuation route and make sure you leave as soon as an evacuation order is issued. Also, please be sure to fuel up your car before you leave.
Make sure you have car chargers for your cell phones and portable devices.
Close storm shutters and board up all windows and glass doors.

Secure all outdoor objects or move them inside.
Bring in gas or charcoal grills, but do not use them inside or even store propane tanks inside the house or garage. Chain propane tanks in an upright position to a secure object away from your home.
Secure your boat or move it to a safer place.
Fill your emergency generator fuel tank, if you have one, and have spare fuel on hand.

As soon as you hear of a hurricane watch or warning it is important, depending on the type of alert, to immediately begin or complete your preparedness. You can never be too prepared when it comes to protecting your loved ones and your property.

If you lean against a window or door, you can keep it from blowing inward. WRONG.. Not a good idea. You are putting yourself in danger remaining in front of windows and doors.

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Tropical Storm Isaac Strengthens – Forecast for South Florida

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on August 24, 2012

Tropical Storm Isaac Strengthens - Forecast for South FloridaTropical Storm Isaac has been gaining strength through the first half of Friday while spinning west-northwest in the Caribbean Sea. Some additional intensification is possible before Isaac interacts with Hispaniola and eastern Cuba Friday night into Saturday.

Thereafter, residents and visitors of Florida and the central/eastern Gulf Coast should continue to monitor the progress of Isaac closely into next week. There is a high probability that the United States will be affected by Isaac.

Bands of heavy rain may trigger flash flooding in Puerto Rico through Friday night, even with Isaac’s center well to the southwest.

Isaac will move over or near Hispaniola – home to Haiti and the Dominican Republic – on Friday, and possibly into Saturday, where 8 to 12 inches of rain is possible (locally 20 inches). Life-threatening flash floods and mudslides will likely result from that amount of rain.

Numerous watches and warnings have been issued for the northern Caribbean islands and the Bahamas.

Isaac Threat Index
Areas shaded in yellow (Aware), including parts of the southern United States, should be vigilant and monitor the progress of Isaac closely. Orange-shaded locations (Alert), including portions of southern Florida, are typically under a watch or warning, or are expected to be in the next day or so. In red-shaded areas, the risk of impact is sufficiently high that preparations should be made for the storm.

Current Information
So, where exactly is the cyclone’s center located now? If you’re plotting the storm along with us, you can view the current information map to get the latitude/longitude coordinates, distance away from the nearest land location, maximum sustained winds and central pressure (measured in millibars).

Tropical Storm/Hurricane Watches
A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions, with sustained winds from 39 to 73 mph, are possible in your area within the next 48 hours. A hurricane watch means that hurricane conditions, with sustained winds of 74 mph or higher, are possible in your area within 48 hours.

Tropical Storm/Hurricane Warnings
A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the specified area in the next 36 hours. A hurricane warning means that hurricane conditions are expected somewhere within the specified area in 36 hours or less.

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2012 Atlantic Hurricane Season Scorecard

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on August 24, 2012

2012 Atlantic Hurricane Season ScorecardAbove is the season-to-date tally of named storms, hurricanes, and major hurricanes, compared to the “average pace” to this point.

The May duo of Tropical Storm Alberto and Tropical Storm Beryl, followed by the bizarre Hurricane Chris and Florida’s drought-quenching Tropical Storm Debby, put us well ahead of the pace. More recently, Hurricane Ernesto, Tropical Storm Florence, Hurricane Gordon and Tropical Storm Helene have added to the total, in addition to the currently active Isaac and Joyce.
On average, the tenth Atlantic storm (“J” storm) arrives by October 19. The earliest-named “J” storm was Jose on August 22 in 2005.

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Tropics Watch: Isaac and Invest 97-L

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on August 24, 2012

Tropics Watch: Isaac and Invest 97-LIn addition to Isaac we are also tracking Invest 97-L in the Atlantic basin.

The above image is an overview of the Atlantic and eastern Pacific Ocean basins, based on analysis provided by Senior Meteorologist and Hurricane Specialist. Named storms, hurricanes, or depressions in either basin will be labeled on the graphic. Any other features of interest we’re keeping an eye on for possible development will be circled.

Invest 97-L

We are tracking a broad area of low pressure in the eastern Atlantic for possible development as it moves off to the west or west-northwest the next several days.

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