Hurrican Shutters

Installing "Peace of Mind"

Hurricane Names for 2012

Posted by cat5shuttersllc on November 21, 2011

Hurricane Names for 2012In the Atlantic Ocean, tropical storms that reach a sustained wind speed of 39 miles per hour are given a name, such as “Tropical Storm Fran”. If the storm reaches a sustained wind speed of 74 miles per hour it is called a hurricane – such as “Hurricane Fran”. So, hurricanes are not given names, tropical storms are given names, and they retain their name if they develop into a hurricane.

Below you will find the listing of hurricane names for the Atlantic Ocean for the year 2012. For every year, there is a pre-approved list of tropical storm and hurricane names. These lists have been generated by the National Hurricane Center since 1953. At first, the lists consisted of only female names; however, since 1979, the lists alternate between male and female.

Hurricanes are named alphabetically from the list in chronological order. Thus the first tropical storm or hurricane of the year has a name that begins with “A” and the second is given the name that begins with “B.” The lists contain hurricane names that begin from A to W, but exclude names that begin with a “Q” or “U.” 2012 Hurricane Names

There are six lists that continue to rotate. The lists only change when there is a hurricane that is so devastating, the name is retired and another hurricane name replaces it. As there were no significant hurricanes in 2006, the 2012 hurricane name list is the same as the 2006 hurricane name list.

Hurricane Names for 2012:

  • Alberto
  • Beryl
  • Chris
  • Debby
  • Ernesto
  • Florence
  • Gordon
  • Helene
  • Isaac
  • Joyce
  • Kirk
  • Leslie
  • Michael
  • Nadine
  • Oscar
  • Patty
  • Rafael
  • Sandy
  • Tony
  • Valerie
  • William

When There Are More Than 21 Named Storms

There are normally less than 21 named tropical storms in any calendar year. In the rare years when more than 21 storms are named the additional storms are given names from the Greek alphabet: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta are used for their names. One question I’ve heard a lot recently is “What happens if we run out of hurricane names?” If we’re unlucky enough to deplete the year’s supply of names we won’t, contrary to popular opinion, simply start using names from next year’s list. In that case, the National Hurricane Center will turn to the Greek alphabet and we’ll have Hurricanes Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, etc.

Distributed by Viestly

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: